Trending February 2024 # Apple Seeds Os X Mountain Lion 10.8.3 Build 12D50 To Developers # Suggested March 2024 # Top 4 Popular

You are reading the article Apple Seeds Os X Mountain Lion 10.8.3 Build 12D50 To Developers updated in February 2024 on the website Kientrucdochoi.com. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested March 2024 Apple Seeds Os X Mountain Lion 10.8.3 Build 12D50 To Developers

Shortly after releasing 10.8.3 build 12D43 to developers, Apple is today seeding build 12D50 with no known issues. Apple isn’t listing any significant changes, but it asked developers to once again focus on AirPlay, AirPort, Game Center, Graphics Drivers, and Safari. The full release notes are available below.

OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.3 build 12D50 Seed Note

OS X Mountain Lion Update 10.8.3 is an update to OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.

Installation Instructions

Please be aware that you will not be able to revert back to your previous system after updating. Please install this update on a system you are prepared to erase if necessary.

– If you have already installed the “OS X Software Update Seed Configuration Utility”, choose “Software Update” from the Apple menu. Otherwise, proceed with the following steps.

– To stop receiving new seed builds, go to the Software Update Preference in System Preferences and where it says “Your computer is set to receive pre- release Software Update seeds”, press the “Change…” button.

Note: If you are using a computer which gets its updates from a local Software Update server, the OS X Software Update Seed Configuration Utility will reconfigure your machine to use Apple’s Software Update servers. Your computer must be able to connect to Apple’s Software Update servers to install the seed. We recommend that you remove any Configuration Profile that specifies a local Software Update server before installing the OS X Software Update Seed Configuration Utility.

Known Issues

– None

Focus Areas

– Graphics Drivers

– Safari

Bug Reporting

This build is being provided to you for testing and development purposes. Should you encounter any problems, please submit a bug report using the online Bug Reporter at chúng tôi Please make sure to include “10.8.3 (12D50)” in the bug title and description. This information will ensure that your bug is processed quickly.

When submitting a bug report, please make sure to include a Summary, Steps to Reproduce, Expected Results, Actual Results, and the diagnostic output generated by running ‘sudo sysdiagnose’ in the Terminal.

Thank you for your support, Worldwide Developer Relations Apple, Inc.

Legal Notices

The OS X pre-release software identified above and the OS X Software Update Seed Configuration Utility are Apple Confidential Information and your use of such software is subject to your Registered Apple Developer Agreement, Mac Developer Program License Agreement, and the applicable license agreements accompanying such software. Distributing such software to anyone other than another Registered Apple Developer who is working for the same entity as you is considered a violation of your agreement with Apple and is damaging to both Apple and those who develop for the Apple platform. We sincerely appreciate your efforts to keep this Apple software Confidential.

You agree that you will not export or reexport any of the software or Confidential Information received from Apple (a) into (or to a national or resident of) any U.S. embargoed countries or (b) to anyone on the U.S. Treasury Department’s list of Specially Designated Nationals or the U.S. Department of Commerce Denied Person’s List or Entity List. You also agree that you will not use said software for any purposes where prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of nuclear, missile, chemical or biological weapons. 

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How To Setup A Web Server In Mac Os X Mountain Lion

In the recent version of Mac OS X, the web server is one of the component that is built-in by default. Prior to Mountain Lion, users can easily turn on the web server via the “Web Sharing” option in the Sharing Preference pane. That component was removed in Mountain Lion. In this tutorial, we will show you how to activate the web server in Mountain Lion, as well as setting up PHP, MySQL and PhpMyAdmin. At the end of this tutorial, you will have a MAMP (Mac, Apache, MySQL, Php) server running on your Mac.

Starting the Apache server

Apache server is pre-installed in Mac OS X, so there is no need to install it. However, to start the Apache server, we will have to use command line in the Terminal.

2. Type the following command:

To restart the Apache server, use the command:

sudo

apachectl restart

To stop the Apache server, use the command:

sudo

apachectl stop

Activating the PHP module

The Apache server is only good enough for you to run static HTML files. If you want to run a more complicated setup, like installing WordPress, you will need to activate the PHP module.

PHP is pre-installed in Mac OS X as well, but it is not included by default.

1. In the terminal, type:

2. Remove down the list until you see the line:

#

LoadModule php5_module libexec

/

apache2

/

libphp5.so

Remove the “#” in front of the line, so it becomes:

3. Save the changes (using shortcut key “Ctrl + o”) and exit (using shortcut key “Ctrl + x”). Restart Apache.

sudo

apachectl restart

The PHP module is now activated.

Configuring Sites folder

1. Open the Finder and go to your Home folder (the folder with a Home icon and your username). Create a new folder “Sites” if it is not available.

2. Back to the Terminal, type the command:

sudo

nano

/

etc

/

apache2

/

users

/

username.conf

Replace the “username” with your login username. In my case, it will be “sudo nano /etc/apache2/users/damienoh.conf“.

3. Copy and paste the following code to the conf file.

Options Indexes MultiViews AllowOverride All Order allow,deny Allow from all

4. Next, type the command:

nano

/

Users

/

username

/

Sites

/

phpinfo.php

and paste the line:

Restart Apache server

Setting up MySQL

MySQL is not included in Mountain Lion, so you will need to download and install it manually.

1. Go to MySQL Download site and download the MySQL installer for Mac. For easier installation, you might want to grab the .DMG image than the one in chúng tôi format.

2. Once the download is completed, open up the installer, you should see two .pkg files and one .prefPane file. Install all three of them.

Setting upi MySQL root password

In the Terminal, type the command:

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

/

bin

/

mysqladmin

-u

root password

'yourpasswordhere'

Replace the “yourpasswordhere” with your own password.

Note: Do not confuse this password with your Mac login account. They are not the same. This is the password for the script to access your database.

Note: Removing MySQL is not as straightforward. Run the commands, line by line, in the terminal:

sudo

rm

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

sudo

rm

-rf

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

StartupItems

/

MySQLCOM

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

PreferencePanes

/

My

*

rm

-rf

~

/

Library

/

PreferencePanes

/

My

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

Receipts

/

mysql

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

Receipts

/

MySQL

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

private

/

var

/

db

/

receipts

/*

mysql

*

Open the file “hostconfig” with the command “sudo nano /etc/hostconfig” and remove the line MYSQLCOM=-YES-.

Installing PhpMyAdmin

PhpMyAdmin is basically a bunch of PHP files, so installing them is a breeze.

1. Download PhpMyAdmin from its website.

2. Extract the compressed file to your Sites folder and rename it as “phpmyadmin”.

3. Open the “phpmyadmin” folder and create a new folder call “config”. Change its permission with the command:

6. Go to the “Authentication” tab and enter MySQL root password in the “Password for config auth” field.

7. Lastly, enter the following commands in the terminal:

sudo

mkdir

/

var

/

mysql

Conclusion

It will probably be easier if you install a third party tool like MAMP, but that will add duplicate features to what is already available in your Mac. With a little tinkering, you can easily get your Mac to be a web server for all your web hosting needs.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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Apple Releases Os X El Capitan, Featuring Full

Apple has officially released OS X El Capitan for the Mac, adding some new improvements as well as bringing parity with changes in iOS 9, released two weeks ago. OS X El Capitan (version 10.11), can be installed on any Mac that runs OS X Yosemite: simply download the free update from the Mac App Store. The release does not feature anything radically new — like the major visual overhaul that came last year — but there are new features as well as a strong focus on overall performance and stability improvements.

Here’s what’s new in Apple’s latest version of the Mac operating system …

Spotlight Search

Apple has made some significant to changes to Spotlight, the system search function that pops up in the center of the display when you hit Command+Space. First off, in El Capitan, it doesn’t have to be in the center. As silly as it sounds, you can now freely resize and position the Spotlight box to match your own preferences for the first time. Apple has also bolstered the library of possible search terms to include more transient and informational data, like weather, sports scores or even YouTube and Vimeo video results. You can also make your search queries a lot more casual and Spotlight will understand what you mean. Rather than typing with obtuse filter syntax, you can use natural language queries like ‘email from Joshua last year’ or ‘presentations from last week’. These queries work great, are easy to remember and formulate, and work in apps like Finder and Mail as well as the Spotlight search bar.

Notes

Crucially, once you upgrade Notes to use iCloud Drive, El Capitan is required to sync with iOS 9. Yosemite users have no choice but to upgrade their Macs if they want to retain cross-platform harmony. Also keep in mind that sketches can only be created and edited on iOS 9 devices — they are only viewable on OS X.

Safari 9

Matching Chrome from three years ago, Safari 9 adds Pinned Tabs. Essentially, you can put your favorite websites permanently in your URL bar as ‘small buttons’ on the left side of the tab bar. The websites stay loaded, so you can quickly switch to them at any time. Another appreciated addition in Safari 9 is revamped AirPlay support: rather than streaming your entire Mac desktop to the Apple TV, you can stream just specific videos embedded in pages. This doesn’t work on all websites, unfortunately, but popular websites like YouTube are supported.

Full-Screen Split View

A common workflow in El Capitan will be to use the new windowing features to put Safari at about 2/3rds width, with a smaller utility or social networking app filing the rest of the space. This is thanks to the addition of Split View for full-screen apps.

Hold down on the green zoom button on any window to activate Split View. Drag the window to either the left or right side of the screen to snap it as a ‘full screen’ app, even though that name is a bit of a misnomer because it isn’t actually filling the whole width of the screen. You can then choose another full-screen app for the other side of the screen. This now mirrors Split View multitasking on iPad, although you can drag the divider to any arbitrary ratio of content and drag files between windows. It adds a lot more flexibility to workflows and is especially useful on larger-screen iMacs … where having just one app dominate the display was comical. The combined Split View appears as its own space in Mission Control and can be dragged around like a normal full-screen app. Most apps adapt beautifully to the split-screen layout but there are some exceptions; Notes refuses to lose its left-hand column so isn’t really suitable as a skinny-width app unless you’re using a single note window.

It’s also worth noting that the new Mission Control drops window labels and hides desktop previews until you slide your mouse towards the top of the screen, which I personally think is a regression. Text labels show temporarily on hover but you lose the glanceable nature of the old behavior.

Mail 

Updates to Mail in OS X El Capitan heavily respect the adoption of full screen. In earlier versions of OS X, Mail was not a good Full Screen citizen. Composing a new mail message would open a window outside of the Full Screen space. Yosemite added an integrated compose window and El Capitan builds on this further by adding a tab bar, so you can compose multiple messages at once. Similar to iOS, you can also slide the compose window down to refer to other messages before you finish sending your message.

Performance Improvements

For graphics, Apple has implemented Metal, its high-performance drawing framework, at the core of El Capitan so that it powers all system-level graphics operations. This should provide better frame rates and snappier transitions across the OS — it’s particularly noticeable for the full-screen sliding animation when switching between maximized windows and desktop spaces. Metal is also available to third-party developers, so game creators will be able to use it to push more performance out of the hardware. Apple also claims it has improved the foundations of OS X in other ways to make everything feel faster. The company claims speed improvements from 4x faster PDF rendering to 1.4x faster app launching. Naturally, real-word gains will vary based on a multitude of factors.

Miscellaneous

Like any operating system update, there’s a bunch of minor improvements and refinements across the system. Following iOS 9 and watchOS, OS X gets the San Fransisco font makeover. There are also minor redesigns to many of the stock interface elements, including some moderate shadowing. It’s personal preference of course, but I think it looks way better than the buttons and controls used in Yosemite. Maps gets Transit directions, Photos finally lets you geotag pictures and supports third-party editing extensions, and there’s even a Find My Friends widget in Notification Center. You can even shake the mouse cursor to enlarge it in case you lose track of what you are doing. There also some welcomed additions for Chinese and Japanese users, including a special system font for Traditional and Simplified Chinese characters (which is apparently better for readability), improved trackpad OCR and as-you-type translation of Hiragana into Japanese.

Conclusion

In summary, El Capitan is not the biggest update in Mac history, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a variety of changes and improvements to enjoy. It’s expected for a maturing platform to have less major additions and it doesn’t really matter when the updates are free.

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Change File Permissions In Mac Os X

You can instantly change file permissions in Mac OS X without getting your hands dirty in the command line by using the Finder instead. All you need to do is access the “Get Info” panel for the file, folder, or application in question. These instructions demonstrate locating the file permissions manager, and how to adjust privileges for items found in Mac OS.

It’s worth mentioning that you can also use this trick to quickly view current file and folder permissions and ownership details in the Mac OS X Finder. To view permissions, just use the Get Info panel as described below but don’t make any modifications. Mac OS X calls permissions “Privileges”, but they mean the same thing.

How to Change File Permissions on Mac

This is the most user friendly way to view or adjust file permissions in Mac OS X, it works with anything found in the Finder file system, be it a file, binary, application, or a folder. Here’s what you’ll want to do:

Select the file or app in the Finder you want to edit permissions for

At the bottom of the Get Info window, you’ll see “Sharing & Permissions”, select the arrow to drop down the options

Adjust permissions* on a per user basis, the options being: read and write, read only, or no access

When finished, just close out of the Get Info window. The changes to permissions happen immediately as you select items from the privilege option dropdown menus.

Permission Types & Explanations of Limitations

The permissions options are fairly self-descriptive in their naming, but here’s a quick overview in case you’re new to the concepts on a file level:

Read & Write: The user can both read the file, and write to the file (make changes, modify the file, delete it, etc)

Read Only: The user can only read the file, and is therefor unable to make changes to the file

No Access: The user has no access to the file at all, meaning the user can not read the file or write to it

When you’re finished setting the desired permissions and privileges, close the Get Info window and the changes will take effect immediately.

Notice that you can’t make files executable through this the Get Info panels, you’ll still need to pull up the terminal for that.

One of our readers pointed out that you can use Get Info to adjust file permissions on remote files using the Mac OS X built-in FTP client, which is pretty convenient if you’re without a separate FTP app but you’re remotely needing to change privileges on something.

Generally speaking, if you’re not sure what to set, you shouldn’t mess around with file permissions since it can change the way a file or application responds to a given document. This is particularly true with system files and applications, as permissions can mean the difference between some apps working and some not. If you’re digging around because of frequent errors regarding access to files or ownership, try using the Recovery Mode method of repairing user permissions that works with Mac OS X 10.7, 10.8, 10.9, 10.10, macOS 10.12, 10.11, 10.13, etc, which can usually sort out those problems automatically without any manual modification of files.

You can also modify permissions from the command line using the ‘chmod’ command followed by flags or sequences and a file name, but that’s really a topic for another article.

Related

How To Use Preview To Convert Images In Os X

If you’re a blogger like me, there’ll be many times when you’ll need to convert an image from one format to another. One of the useful tools that most professionals use is Photoshop. The thing is, Photoshop is really expensive, and so are a number of other programs that can perform this function. If you are using Mac, you can easily use the built-in tool – Preview – to convert images. Here’s how.

Most of you might already know of and have used Preview before, but for those who don’t, Preview is Apple’s default utility for viewing images and PDF files on your Mac. One of the options it includes is the ability to export an image to a different file format.

To do this, simply open the image you want to convert in Preview, and follow the steps below:

1. Open up the File menu. From the drop-down menu, choose “Export.”

2. From the “Format” menu select the format you want to convert your image to.

By default, the format window will only include options for JPEG, JPEG-2000, OpenEXR, PDF, PNG (default selection), and TIFF. However, by holding down the “Option” key, it will bring up a number of other formats including GIF, ICNS, Microsoft BMP, Microsoft ICON, Photoshop, SGI, and TGA.

If you want to convert a batch of images together, you won’t want to do it one by one. Instead, to batch convert all of the photos together, follow the steps below:

1. Select all the images you want to convert. To do this, either hold-down “Shift” or “Command” while selecting the photos.

3. Once Preview is open, you’ll note that all the images will be shown in a list next to the displayed image, similar to the screenshot below:

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

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Expand Google Chrome Horizontally In Mac Os X

Note: this only applies to Google Chrome in Mac OS X. It will not work for any other application.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

Sign up for all newsletters.

By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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