Trending February 2024 # Apple Watch Blood Pressure And Glucose Monitoring Delayed Until 2024 # Suggested March 2024 # Top 9 Popular

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An Apple Watch blood pressure sensor has hit development snags, prompting a delay in introducing the feature until 2024 at the earliest, says a reliable source.

Employees are testing Apple Watch blood pressure monitoring and glucose tracking but the features are reportedly a few years away from debuting.

Apple allegedly made this decision after early testing showed unreliable performance and inaccurate readings for blood pressure monitoring.

Despite those development snags delaying the alleged new sensors, watchOS 9 will nevertheless add body temperature monitoring and other new health-focused features to the iPhone’s Health app.

Apple Watch won’t get blood pressure sensing until 2024?

Unnamed sources told reporter Mark Gurman, the author of a new Bloomberg report, that employee testing has concluded that a blood pressure sensor currently does not show specific systolic and diastolic readings. As a result, this feature got delayed until “2024 at the earliest,” possibly even longer.

Blood-pressure features may become a key selling point for smartwatches in coming years, but the technology hasn’t been easy to master. Though Apple rivals such as Samsung Electronics have launched watches with the capability, they require monthly calibration with a traditional monitor. Last year, Alphabet-owned Fitbit launched a public study to test wrist-based blood-pressure measurement.

As for a non-invasive blood sugar sensor, a holy grail for diabetics, this promising feaure is still very much work-in-progress, the report cautions.

The iPhone maker is running trials of its blood-pressure technology on employees. Its planned approach won’t tell users their specific systolic and diastolic readings—the numbers used to assess blood pressure—but would warn those wearing the watch that they may have hypertension, which is high-blood pressure, and should consult a doctor or use a standard blood pressure checker.

Until it arrives, Apple could, Bloomberg speculates, introduce support for third-party glucose meters in the Health app to help those with diabetes. Both blood pressure and blood sugar sensors have been several years in development.

New Apple Watch health features coming in 2023

As for the health-focused features that could be launching this year, Gurman said recently in his Power On newsletter that both the iPhone and Apple Watch would gain new health-tracking features with iOS 16 and watchOS 9, including expanded sleep and fitness tracking, as well as new medicine management that will let users scan their pill bottles into the Health app.

Today’s report adds more color to teh claim:

The software will monitor adherence and remind users to take their medication. But the initial version of the feature for this year is unlikely to include all of the planned functionality. Apple also is planning to add more workout types and additional metrics related to running within the Workout app on the watch.

watchOS 09 should also improve upon atrial fibrillation detection:

As part of watchOS 9, Apple is planning to improve its existing atrial fibrillation detection feature with a new capability to measure how long a person is in a state of atrial fibrillation across a certain period. There may also be more workout types and additional metrics for running workouts in the Apple Watch’s Workout app.

Last but not least, the Cupertino giant could also add a body temperature sensor to Apple Watch Series 8 in 2023 to help women with fertility planning initially before implementing other features for the sensor via future updates.

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Relax! This Phone Measures Your Blood Pressure

This Swiss electronics company is on a mission: to stop millions of people dying of ignorance each year.

Before high blood pressure can be controlled, though, it needs to be detected, and that’s the part that Leman Micro Devices wants to make simpler. It is showing off its solution at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona this week.

Measuring blood pressure usually requires a bulky and inflatable cuff that fits around the upper arm, squeezing it till it stops the flow of blood in the artery then releasing it until the flow starts again. Some cuffs can automatically detect the stop and start and record the pressure at each point; others require the medical practitioner to listen to the blood flow using a stethoscope and record the pressure manually.

The arm isn’t the only part of the body where an artery is accessible enough for the measurement of blood pressure, though: There’s one in the index finger, on the side of the middle phalanx nearest the middle finger.

Depending on how you hold your smartphone, you might already be in the habit of pressing this part of your finger on the top, which is exactly where Leman Micro Devices wants phone makers to install its tiny package of chips and sensors.

In that position, the package can measure blood pressure using a pressure sensor covered by a flexible pad a few millimeters across. And it can tell when the blood flow stops and starts because the package also contains infrared emitters and receivers that allow it to measure pulse rate and blood oxygen level. With a little mathematical wizardry, it’s also possible to calculate when someone takes a breath from cyclic variation in blood pressure, according to LMD CEO Mark-Eric Jones, and the package also includes an infrared thermometer for contactless temperature measurement, meaning it can measure five vital signs in all.

Named for the white coats that doctors traditionally wear in many western countries, it describes how some patients’ blood pressure will rise as they become nervous at the prospect of a visit to the doctor. It can be exacerbated by the discomfort or pain sometimes associated with the measurement cuff.

The device is undergoing clinical trials in Switzerland, he said. Because it relies on the same physical principals that have served to measure blood pressure for the last 120 years, and because the testing process for blood pressure measuring devices is standardized internationally—even down to the format in which the results must be presented—Jones expects few difficulties in getting to market. The company is seeking approvals in 14 regulatory regions (the European Union is one, the U.S. another) covering 97 percent of the world smartphone market, he said.

To maximize the accuracy of the device and simplify its production, LMD came up with an interesting way to get around manufacturing variations in the “color” of the two infrared LEDs it uses in the blood oximeter. It calibrates them in the factory, recording the peak wavelength to within 1 nanometer, and storing that in a database alongside the serial number burned into each device.

Choosing when, and how, to take certain measurements can have dramatic consequences—in manufacturing and in health.

The Best Sleep Tracking Apps For Apple Watch And Iphone

Tracking your sleep routine can often lead to insights into all sorts of habits or quirks detrimental to a good night’s sleep. Before Apple Watch, apps promising to analyze your nightly resting patterns and devise remedies to improve on them were already plentiful. Yet after the release of the wrist-worn gadget, a new surge in the category ensued for its ease of use on watch and enhanced precision in measuring body movements at night.

In order to single out the creme de la creme of applications, we have put through their paces both standalone sleep trackers on iPhone and an array of apps requiring the assistance of Apple Watch.

No matter if you rock iPhone and Apple Watch together or solo, find out below which sleep trackers are worthwhile your time and money.

The best sleep trackers for iPhone

To cover all the bases we have contrived two sections: the first one is going to be dedicated to iPhone only applications whereas the subsequent one will revolve around all sleep trackers harnessing the power of iPhone and Apple Watch. If you’re here for Watch apps and don’t regard the first half as exhaustive, do make sure to read on as many of the watch compatible apps also function on their own.

Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock

Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock is one of the most comprehensive apps in the field, posing an effective merger of alarm clock and sleep tracker. Notwithstanding their ultimate goal to get you hooked on the premium subscription service, the basic offer is available entirely free of charge to you, and that one alone is conceptualised well enough to make the cut.

Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock not only looks elegant but also houses a bevy of features such as intelligent alarms (so as not to rattle you when you are in a deep sleep phase) in the morning. The flagship feature however is the sleep tracking, for which Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock in fact offers two different methods of motion detection: your iPhone’s accelerometer or the microphone.

UI wise the colors and animations are chosen well and when activated at night, your iPhone’s wake screen fades in and out softly and very easy on the eye.

Some of the more elaborate statistics are sadly hidden behind the premium subscription fee ($29 a year), but your arm isn’t twisted too badly by the developers at Northcube as the free ones sure enough fulfil their job. If you’re in the market for a sleep tracker that does not have to sit in the corner of your mattress while you sleep, this is one of the best out there.

Device support: iPhone, iPad

Notable features: Microphone motion detection, intelligent alarms, sleep quality and activity analytics (Premium)

Cost: Free (in-app subscription service)

Good Morning Alarm Clock

For one, the home screen comprises an alarm clock and a weather extension, making the hub of the app somewhat more informative.

Upside number two comes in the form of an under the hood feature that should be regarded indispensable by anyone (but unfortunately is not): HealthKit integration.

Device support: iPhone, iPad

Notable features: HealthKit Integration, Weather extension, Intelligent alarms

Cost:$4.99

By and large you have two solid options in Sleep Cycle Alarm Clock and Good Morning Alarm Clock, two apps that are similar enough to be mentioned in the same breath but at the same time different enough for two seperate entries.

Honorable Mention

Stock Clock App: Bedtime

Despite the somehow differing value proposition, we can’t brush past this one without at least mentioning it. Since the introduction of iOS 10, Apple has seriously ramped up their own efforts at providing guidance for healthy sleeping habits.

Despite the somehow differing value proposition, we can’t brush past this one without at least mentioning it. Since the introduction of iOS 10, Apple has seriously ramped up their own efforts at providing guidance for healthy sleeping habits.

As a consequence, the bedtime feature inside your stock Clock app now boasts smart bedtime alerts and morning alarms based on your desired sleep duration. It also has a tentative go at sleep analytics, which tie nicely into your Health app. If you’re satisfied with an assistant that pushes you towards a healthier sleep cycle this could be up your alley, but don’t expect it to supplant a refined sleep tracker app. Find out more about Bedtime here.

The best sleep trackers for Apple Watch

With Apple Watch, the days of carefully planting your iPhone on the mattress are over. In fact in many cases your iPhone is no longer required at all, until you want a closer look or breakdown of your accrued sleep stats that is. Such being the case, here are the best trackers available on both iOS and watchOS that work in tandem to shoulder the workload intelligently.

Sleep++

Condensed in one word, Sleep++ is minimalist. This is a good thing in a sea of apps clamoring for your details, your money or even third party tracking devices that exclusively work with the sleep tracker you just downloaded.

Sleep++ does away with all the clutter and delivers an experience stripped to the bare minimum, but in doing so, fashions a reliable symbiosis between watch and iPhone plus easy to read statistics.

If you are quick to worry about your watch’s battery life, you will appreciate the fact that Sleep++ launches and tracks completely disconnected from your iPhone, meaning you can toggle on Airplane Mode before starting your snooze and your watch will emerge relatively undrained in the morning.

Start and finish your sleeping session on your wrist and at the next opportunity, your watch will transmit the data recorded to your iPhone for a pretty simplistic but sufficient visualization of your night.

The implications of minimalist in this instance are no weekly analytics or trends, no heartbeat monitoring and also no notifications or widgets on your iPhone. It does however tie nicely into HealthKit, which is the minimum bar to clear considering Apple’s push for Health in iOS 10.

Device support: iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch

Notable features: HealthKit integration, lets you use Airplane Mode on watch

Cost: Free (in-app purchase)

Sleep Diary

In terms of feature density, Sleep Diary is a whole different animal. While the mechanics of the tracking process remain the same (start and stop your bedtime manually on your watch), the core function is embedded in a slew of complementary features ranging from dispensable to pretty quintessential.

On the negligible end of the scale we can find stuff like a bedtime countdown widget for your iPhone, which will strike most as a little gimmicky, then again on the other end of the aisle, Sleep Diary boasts sage settings such as wake up and bedtime alerts (pushed to your wrist) based on your set sleep duration and a box for ‘sleep onset latency’ – because most people don’t fall asleep without delay.

Most importantly though, the watch is capable of capturing your heartbeat data in addition to the movement tracking, which makes for another enticing layer of data to analyze in the statistics. Sudden spikes in your heart rate at night can be indicative of various circumstances or conditions, and the ability to monitor that is hands down a big plus.

Once on your wrist, the app also operates entirely disconnected from your iPhone. Whenever connected next, it will feed the app and HealthKit with the intel. There is very little to gripe about here, so let’s not grasp at straws just for the sake of it, especially considering Sleep Diary is available to download for free. If you want a comprehensive tracker that also helps you maintain a healthy sleep rhythm, by all means give this one a go.

Device support: iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch

Notable features: HealthKit integration, use Airplane Mode on watch

Cost: Free (in-app purchase)

Sleep Tracker (SleepMatic)

Dipping our toes into sleep trackers hiding behind a paywall, SleepMatic ($1.99) sticks out for two defining reasons. Interestingly, these are features hard to find amongst the freebies hence if you can pony up the money equivalent to a cup of coffee, this investment will undoubtedly be the more wholesome one for your sleep.

As far as hitting the ground running, paid-for apps are generally unmatched in their experience in that the minute they are downloaded, you are good to go. This holds true for SleepMatic too, which will not pry into your personal details or data but is ready to serve from the get-go. This positive aside, the two standout features here are automatic sleep tracking (meaning no manual start and stop sleep button on watch) and a movement sensitivity lever to better tailor the recorded data to your sleeping type for improved measuring accuracy.

Both of these treats make SleepMatic a more effortless tracker in their own way: the perks of not having to remember enabling and disabling sleep tracking every night and morning respectively are self-evident, while scrubbing the sensitivity scale up and down can retrospectively edit results for the better or worse to precisely capture your sleep quality.

To give you one example of how this works, when the app detected me waking up seven times (because I like to toss, turn and kick in my sleep) but I only recall two incidents, I can dial down sensitivity until that count has shrunken accordingly. This allows for continuous adjustments until you have found a sensitivity level that reconciles data and real life experience, something that will give you great confidence in future results.

In addition to the showpiece features, SleepMatic keeps tabs on your heart rate as well. Furthermore it boasts a neat widget on your iPhone, bedtime alerts, works untethered on your watch (which displays a great deal of information) and of course also features seamless integration with HealthKit.

Device support: iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch

Notable features: Automatic sleep tracking, sensitivity settings, HealthKit integration, lets you use Airplane mode on watch

Cost: $1.99

Pillow

Pillow is visually stunning on both iOS and your Apple Watch, but it is more than just a pretty facade. Under the hood, Pillow offers solid sleep and heart rate tracking (however manually initiated every evening) and on top of that, an audio layer to record snoring or other anomalies at night.

The utility of such feature strongly hinges on the type of sleeper, even so it can prove vital for users (unknowingly) suffering from pesky conditions like sleep apnea or less grave issues. Having this additional layer and the option to correlate noise spikes with your heart rate or sleep phases is straight up terrific.

Next to noise recordings and the neat looks, Pillow promotes sleep goals and derives smart bed and wakeup times from it. Laudably, it bolsters a function called ‘sleep aid’ that will play calming sounds from your iPhone until your watch determines you have fallen asleep. By the same token, ‘smart wakeup’ functions conversely, ensuring the alarm will not go off before you have ascended from a deep sleep phase and entered the territory of light sleep.

There are more whistles and bells (a sleep lab, power-nap mode, in-depth statistics, etc) available for an in-app purchase valued at $4.99 – yet the basic outfit of Pillow is more than serviceable on its own.

As always, the service interlocks hassle-free with HealthKit and iCloud synchronisation is offered to relay your data to the even larger screen of your iPad. In turn, it passes on a widget for your iOS devices, which is not a major loss in our book as most apps haven’t been able to provide additional value through that window anyway. If you are not religiously opposed to creating a profile with Pillow (the downside of free apps) and want form over function, this one is absolutely worth a shot.

Device support: iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch

Notable features: Noise recording, sleep aid and smart alarm, HealthKit integration, Airplane mode on watch, power nap (premium).

Cost: Free (in-app purchase)

AutoSleep

AutoSleep is one of the behemoths in the sleep tracker category: powerful, rich in features, available across all your devices. By the same token, the app is arguably unrivalled when it comes to the level of sophistication in measurements and handoff capabilities between devices. That is, it deploys elaborate algorithms to track your sleep on either iPhone or Apple Watch and clocks your bedtime accurately, most of the time without you even noticing.

Instead, the app is capable of displaying so many (nifty) data points and information that ironically it is likely to feel smothering or daunting to the large, laid-back constituency on iOS. In other words, this ain’t your gateway drug to sleep tracking, it’s the endgame.

Device support: iPhone, Apple Watch

Notable features: HealthKit integration, daily, weekly and monthly sleep analysis, Activity Ring like visualization of results including rings for sleep, move, heart rate, device charge, daylight.

Cost: $2.99

Honorable Mentions

Sleep Watch (Free, in app purchase)

Like SleepMatic, Sleep Watch does a great job at tracking and archiving your sleep all week around, and like SleepMatic it is going to cost you a little bit of money upfront. In this case we are talking about five bucks, which is why it took a back seat to the comparatively cheaper SleepMatic.

Cost: Free

SleepRate – Sleep Therapy (Free, in app purchase) 

At the onset, SleepRate was a sure candidate for the winners’ list, but during the time of testing, it occasionally failed to transfer data to the iPhone in the morning, which is naturally extremely frustrating.

Whenever it works, the data provided on iPhone is great and offers a refreshing twist in that before and after starting the tracking on Apple Watch, you will have to answer a couple of questions on iPhone about naps and fatigue throughout the day and sleep quality after your night. This data is subsequently taken into account in the evaluation of your watch records and overall sleep ratings – a clever means to make the data more reliable and personal.

Regrettably, your patience might start wearing thin if the data transmission fails repeatedly in the morning. If you’re a risk taker, try your luck.

It ain’t over till the fat lady sings!

Video Roundup: Best Apple Watch Features

In addition to a bunch of high-profile reviews of the Apple Watch and first unboxing videos of the device’s packaging, major outlets have also produced videos which highlight specific features of the wrist-worn device, such as health and fitness tracking, notifications, design and more.

Reading detailed reviews takes time so you may want to check out these videos first and save longform write-ups for weekend reading.

The Verge likes the device a lot, but slams Apple for not including options to customize the notification sounds and Taptics on the Watch.

I couldn’t set a different alert for messages than for mail or calendar invites; they all just sort of felt the same. Without this ability, the Taptic Engine is just a small improvement over existing smartwatches. Let me create and set my own notifications, and it’s a revolution.

Luckily, this is easily fixed in software.

Getting notifications to work best for you means really buying into a single ecosystem for everything to work well out of the box, meaning non-Apple users may want to wait a while until developers build more support for the device.

For example, it’s easy to send iMessages from the Watch, but there’s no way to use WhatsApp or Hangouts. I spend a huge part of my day in Slack; it’s somewhat useful to know people are mentioning you in a chat room because of taps on your wrist, but it would be much better if you could actually do something about it.

Thankfully, Apple’s really good at iterating products and I have no doubt in my mind that a second or third-generation Apple Watch will fix the vast majority of teething issues.

After spending a week with the device, Bloomberg Business’ Joshua Topolsky was fascinated by its speedy software and motion tracking, controlled by the Apple’s new S1 processor, which packs in multiple components on a single chip.

The Telegraph says the Apple Watch interface is a mixture of using the Digital Crown dial to zoom in and out on a screen that is too small to pinch and zoom, and using it as a back button.

An excerpt from the review:

Again, battery life doesn’t seem to be a major concern.

Even using the Watch intensively, it never struggled to last a whole day, and once made two full days, just.

That’s certainly reassuring!

CNET takes us on a tour of the many-nested worlds of the Apple Watch interface and watchfaces.

Swapping bands out:

What’s in the box:

And their general feelings about the product:

Mashable finds the S1 chip powering the Watch impressive, but notes the occasional lag and other issues and teething issues.

Mashable’s review notes:

Like any 1.0 product, the Apple Watch isn’t perfect. The S1 chip has pep, but the watch could lag. The hyped Taptic response is useful, but not a game-changer. And I can’t make myself care about the ability to send heartbeats (though I do like to occasionally check my heart rate, especially after vigorous activity).

For the most part, the lag is caused by the fact that third-party Watch apps actually run on your iPhone. Only a storyboard and user interface assets and animations are beamed back from your iPhone to the Watch via Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, hence the lag.

After Apple allows truly native apps to execute on the Watch itself later this year, the lag should go away.

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CityTV

Hopefully these videos will get you a better idea of what using Apple’s wearable device in real-life scenarios feels like.

Are you be pre-ordering yours come this Friday?

How To Share Your Activity Data From Apple Watch And Iphone

Need some inspiration to stick to your fitness regime? Or want to push your friends towards a healthier lifestyle? Well, sharing your Activity data from Apple Watch or iPhone might be a good idea. 

It not only enables you to share data with trainers for better guidance but also allows you to compete with friends in weekly challenges. Amazing, right? Now that you are all pepped up, let me show you to set up Activity Sharing and compete using your Apple Watch and iPhone.

What to know before you start sharing Activity?

Activity Sharing works as a two-way lane for sharing daily progress, monitoring workouts, exchanging encouragements, and more. And you can add up to 40 friends.

Notably, you won’t get a comprehensive data chart, health trends, or alerts like you do with iOS 15 Health Sharing. Instead, only these data points are shared across the board:

Daily Activity rings progress

Steps and distance traveled

Standing hours

Workout type

Duration of the exercises

Calories burned

Along with that, they can also see your iCloud email address, time zone, and the Workout awards you have won.

What about my privacy?

When you enable Activity Sharing, Apple will also receive a copy of this data. As per Apple, this allows them to share the data with the other involved party securely.

The tech giant also adds that they retain the data for a short span and only use it to enable and facilitate the setting. You can check the privacy details anytime from the Fitness app; tap See how your data is managed from the summary tab.

Turn on Activity Sharing on iPhone

To invite and add friends to Activity Sharing, you must enable the feature. You’ll need to use the paired iPhone to do so.

And if it is not enabled, a prompt will appear on your Apple Watch, “To start sharing your activity, use the Activity app on your iPhone.“

Launch the Fitness app and go to the Sharing Tab.

Tap Get Started to enable the setting.

How to add friends to share Activity on Apple Watch or iPhone

Send invitation from Apple Watch

Open the Activity app.

Swipe left and scroll to the bottom.

Tap Invite a Friend.

Here, look for the friend and tap their name.

You can check out all the previously invited people here; tap the name to Invite Again or Remove the invite.

Invite using iPhone

This section also shows pending invites. Swipe left, and tap Delete to remove them, and resend the invite if you wish to.

How to accept Activity Sharing invite

The moment someone sends you an Activity Sharing invite, your Apple Watch and iPhone should ping. And here’s what you need to do next.

On Apple Watch

Launch the Activity app, swipe left, and then scroll down.

You’ll see the invite under an Awaiting Your Reply heading.

Tap Accept or Decline accordingly.

On iPhone

That’s it! You are all set to share your activity data with your friends. Now, let’s see how to challenge them.

Compete with friends on the Activity app

Whenever a friend closes all three rings or achieves something great, you will get a notification on your Watch. Hit Compete (from the notification) and let the seven-day war begin.

And if you want to start the challenge upfront, here’s what you should do.

Challenge a friend to compete from your iPhone

Launch the Fitness app → Sharing tab.

Tap the friend’s name you want to compete with.

Select Compete with ‘name/iCloud ID.’

Tap Invite ‘name/iCloud ID’ to set the challenge.

How to compete on Apple Watch

Open the Activity app, swipe left, and select the friend.

Scroll down and hit Compete.

Tap Invite ‘name/iCloud ID‘ to confirm the action.

Once your friend has accepted the invitation, it’s game time! You earn a point for every percent added to the rings. A maximum of 600 points for grabs in a day and 4,200 points in a week.

One who has the most points is declared the winner. Along with bragging rights, the winner also earns an award. So, let’s get moving, no slacking, my friend!

How to check your friend’s progress

Whether you are competing with a friend or not, you might want to keep an eye out for their progress. And offer praises for their successes, support during stormy days, and motivate them to do better each day.

On Apple Watch

Open the Activity app, swipe left, and select the friend.

You’ll see their rings first; scroll down to see all the details.

On iPhone

In the Fitness app, go to the Sharing tab.

Tap the friend’s name.

Here, you can see all the shared metrics.

Look at everyone’s progress at once from iPhone

Launch the Fitness app → Sharing tab.

Tap Sort.

Here, you’ll see multiple metrics like Move, Steps, Exercise, and Workout to choose from.

Select the preferred option.

Now, all the friends will be listed in ascending order of the metric selected.

How to mute notifications, hide or stop sharing activity

The sharing window on iPhone and Apple Watch also boasts a few more actions.

How to send a message to all friends from the Activity app

You surpassed your daily goal and want to share the good news with everyone. However, sending individual messages might eat up your time.

Apple has wisely thought of that as well, and here’s how you can share your success with all.

From the Sharing tab, tap the Account icon.

Select the Message icon.

Type in the message, and send it to all.

Share Activity rings with those who don’t have Apple Watch

What if you wish to flex your success with someone who doesn’t own an Apple Watch? Here’s how to do it.

Fire up the Fitness app → Sharing tab, tap on Me.

Tap the Share button from the top right of the page.

Here select a preferred option; you can email the data, share it on Twitter, Facebook, print, or even save it to Files.

How to view your Activity awards

As mentioned above, the app also offers awards when you win a competition. And, you can easily keep track of your ever-growing gallery.

From iPhone

In the Fitness app, go to the Summary tab.

Scroll down to the Awards section

Tap Show More.

From Apple Watch

Open the Activity app.

Swipe left to the last (third) window.

Scroll down to explore the section.

You can check all the awards and competitions in which you have taken part here.

Fixes to common issues with Activity Sharing

Can’t send an invitation

Reconfirm your friend’s Apple ID and resend the invitation.

Try to sign out of your iCloud account, and they sign in again.

Check your Activity sharing friend list. If you have 40 friends, you might have to remove someone before adding a new one.

Ensure that you’re signed in to iCloud and the iPhone is connected to the internet.

Sign out and sign in to your iCloud account.

Enable and disable Airplane Mode.

I hope this article gave you a comprehensive understanding of how to set up and share your activity on the Apple Watch and iPhone.

I should confess, I am not a fitness freak but, competing with friends and the euphoria of completing those rings is quite tempting. You should surely give it a try.

Read more:

Author Profile

Arshmeet

A self-professed Geek who loves to explore all things Apple. I thoroughly enjoy discovering new hacks, troubleshooting issues, and finding and reviewing the best products and apps currently available. My expertise also includes curating opinionated and honest editorials. If not this, you might find me surfing the web or listening to audiobooks.

21 Apple Watch Developers Reveal Their Wares

21 Apple Watch developers reveal their wares

While the Android world is setting its eyes on MWC 2024 next week, those from the Apple camp are more fixated on late April. That is when the company will be fully launching the Apple Watch and when the world will finally get to see what Cupertino’s take on smartwatches will really be. But as experience showed so far, a smartwatch is only as good as the stuff you can do on it, and some developers are now revealing the things you will be able to do once the Apple Watch hits the stores.

Given the extremely small screen space, there is not much you can do on a smartwatch. At least not without some imagination and creativity. There will, of course, be some that will try to push the limits of what can fit inside a watch face, but given Apple’s more fine-grained control over products in the App Store, we might see very few of those.

It probably won’t come as a shock that there are a lot of fitness related Apple Watch apps coming our way. There’s Nike, which will let you to view leaderboards and challenge friends. There’s an Exact Fitness Timer and Fitness Spades, both from the same developer, that lets you track your exercises as well as pick out a random exercise challenge for yourself. For something more sports-specific, there’s Slopes for skiers and snowboards for checking out your own stats and the MLB app for checking out your favorite baseball team’s scores.

Productivity is another area where smartwatches are supposedly useful, and there is nothing more productive than todo lists. Popular iOS app Clear is making its way to Apple Watch, bringing users a minimalist and easy to use checklist. Home Remote, as well as apps from Honeywell and Lutron turn the smartwatch into an always there smart home control hub. OfficeTime gives you a quick way to log your working hours and Prompt takes the drudgery out of trying to keep up with your presentations.

Tying up with an iPhone’s location sensors makes the Apple Watch the perfect traveling companion. Naturally, you’ll find apps that try to capitalize on this. American Airlines notifies you of your boarding gate, departure time, and other tidbits of information you’ll need for a stress-free journey. Citymapper puts mass-transit information on your wrist as well as alarms for when to get off or on certain stops. Interestingly, Pinterest arrives on Apple Watch as a location-based app, informing you when you are nearby pinned locations. And when you’re checking into Starwood Hotels, a simple will be all you need. And if you drive around in an electric BMW i3, the BMW i app will let you know your car’s charge level and even where you parked it.

A smartwatch isn’t all about work, however, and can be fun too. Naturally, you’ll find Facebook and Twitter on board, which may make the Apple Watch an added distraction. There are also some rather whimsical apps, like Infinitweet which takes a screenshot of your extra long tweet, spoken through the mic of course, and posts the image on Twitter to get around the 160-character limit. While Peeps is a video-only group messaging service, the Apple Watch app will server as a notification device, displaying just the first frame of an incoming video message. Feed Wrangler brings the latest news to your wrist, and even gives you the option to read the whole thing right there.

These are just some of the apps that will be greeting you when you don the Apple Watch in April.

SOURCE: Wareable

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