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Introduction to Binary Tree vs Binary Search Tree

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Head to Head Comparison Between Binary Tree vs Binary Search Tree (Infographics)

Below are the top 8 differences between Binary Tree vs Binary Search Tree:

Binary tree Binary search tree

As it does not have any specific condition for its child nodes, it is useful in representing a hierarchical structure and not an ordered structure. Ancestral family hierarchy is an example of binary tree. Binary search tree can be used to represent both hierarchical structure and an ordered structure based on its child node conditions.

Since there is no ordering of data in Binary tree, duplicate values are allowed here. There is an ordering of data. The value of the left node must be smaller than the parent node and the value of the right node must be higher than the parent node. This applies to subtrees as well. Hence, duplicate values are not allowed here.

We can perform operations on Binary tree but it takes longer time than binary search tree as the nodes are not in an ordered manner. The operations can be search, update, insert or delete. The operations done on Binary search tree is done in a faster manner be it delete, update, insert or search because of the ordering of nodes. Lookups are done easily in binary search trees.

The top node is called the root node which has left and right pointer. Left pointer has an address of the left subtree and right pointer has right subtree. This itself is a subtree of binary tree. Only difference is in the ordering of right and left nodes. The organization is the same as binary tree with a root node, left, and right nodes.

We can edit the values in nodes as per our need and still, it remains as a binary tree. If we edit the values of the binary search tree, it is important to check whether the values still meet the condition of left and right nodes. If not, it will be reduced to a binary tree.

Rooted trees, full binary tree, degenerate tree, perfect and complete binary trees are the types of binary trees. If the height of binary tree ‘h’ has ‘2h-1’ nodes, it is called perfect binary tree. The types of binary search tree are Red-black trees, T-trees, Splay trees, and AVL trees. All these trees have a relative order in the arrangement of nodes.

We cannot say all Binary trees are binary search trees. Some may follow the condition but some may not. All Binary search trees are binary trees as it is the subset of binary trees and whether the condition is met, it is a binary tree always.

The only condition for a binary tree is that the child nodes must be of number two. There are two main conditions in a binary search tree. The child nodes must be two and the left node should have values less than parent. Right nodes should have values greater than parent node.

                    Key Differences of Binary Tree vs Binary Search Tree

In binary tree, the subtrees can be moved from left to right or vice versa without any calculations or ordering. This cannot be done in binary search tree. Even if we calculate the data in the nodes, it will not be correct to move left to right due to the constraints. Binary search tree is the perfect version of data tree to do lookups in data and to sort data in an efficient manner. Insertion and deletion of data also happen faster than a binary tree.

Binary search is used in algorithms where we search a specific item in the entire tree where the arrays are sorted. The search can happen only on sorted arrays. Binary search tree is otherwise called a sorted or ordered tree because the search can happen easily over here for any values. This binary search cannot be done on binary trees as it is not ordered.

Ordered operations are efficiently supported in both binary and binary search trees with search, insert, and traversal operations. It is not restricted that binary tree must be unordered always and thus any kind of operations can be done in binary tree. If the operation is ordered, then it can be done on the subtrees of binary search trees.

Binary search tree, perfect binary tree, full binary tree, etc. are formed from the base of a binary tree structure. Balanced binary search trees such as 2-3 trees, red-black trees, etc. are formed from binary search trees. Most of these trees are height-balanced.

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Implementing A Binary Search Tree In Javascript

Tree Data Structure

A tree is a collection of nodes connected by some edges. Conventionally, each node of a tree holds some data and reference to its children.

Binary Search Tree

Binary Search tree is a binary tree in which nodes that have lesser value are stored on the left while the nodes with a higher value are stored at the right.

For instance, visual representation of a valid BST is −

25 /   20   36  /   / 10 22 30 40

Let’s now implement our very own Binary Search Tree in JavaScript language.

Step 1: The Node Class

This class will represent a single node present at various points in the BST. A BST is nothing but a collection of nodes storing data and child references placed according to the rules described above.

class Node{    constructor(data) {       chúng tôi = data;       chúng tôi = null;       this.right = null;    }; };

To create a new Node instance, we can call this class like this with some data −

const newNode = new Node(23);

This will create a new Node instance with data set to 23 and left and right reference both being null.

Step 2: The Binary Search Tree Class: class BinarySearchTree{    constructor(){       chúng tôi = null;    }; };

This will create the Binary Search Tree class which we can call with the new keyword to make a tree instance.

Now as we are done with the basic stuff let’s move on to inserting a new node at the right place (according to the rules of BST described in definition).

Step 3: Inserting a Node in BST class BinarySearchTree{    constructor(){       chúng tôi = null;    }    insert(data){       var newNode = new Node(data);       if(this.root === null){          this.root = newNode;       }else{          this.insertNode(this.root, newNode);       };    };    insertNode(node, newNode){       if(newNode.data < node.data){          if(node.left === null){             chúng tôi = newNode;          }else{             this.insertNode(node.left, newNode);          };       } else {          if(node.right === null){             node.right = newNode;          }else{             this.insertNode(node.right,newNode);          };       };    }; }; Example Full Binary Search Tree Code: class Node{    constructor(data) {       chúng tôi = data;       chúng tôi = null;       this.right = null;    }; }; class BinarySearchTree{    constructor(){       chúng tôi = null;    }    insert(data){       var newNode = new Node(data);       if(this.root === null){          this.root = newNode;       }else{          this.insertNode(this.root, newNode);       };    };    insertNode(node, newNode){       if(newNode.data < node.data){          if(node.left === null){             chúng tôi = newNode;          }else{             this.insertNode(node.left, newNode);          };       } else {          if(node.right === null){             node.right = newNode;          }else{             this.insertNode(node.right,newNode);          };       };    }; }; const BST = new BinarySearchTree(); BST.insert(1); BST.insert(3); BST.insert(2);

5 Best Christmas Tree Lights Controlled By Phone/Tablet

5 Best Christmas tree lights controlled by phone/tablet The greatest remote-controlled smart lights can make your Christmas spirit shine

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Christmas tree lights are a great decoration to use

throughout the Christmas season.

Nowadays, more and more devices can be controlled by an app on our phones. Everything tends to be smart and easily managed, not by a physical button but one on our tablet.

Christmas lights usually have a remote near the charger from where you can manage different lighting modes. If you are tired of having to go near it every time, you can choose the smart Christmas lights and control them from your phone.

If you are in the process of buying new Christmas decorations for your home, computer-controlled Christmas lights are a must-have. Here are some of the best lights you can pick.

What are the best computer-controlled Christmas tree lights?

Multicolor strings

Works with Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, and Razer Chroma

Bluetooth connectivity for pairing the device to the Wi-Fi network

It is not waterproof

Check price

Twinkly TWS600STP are one of the best app-controlled Christmas tree lights.

It can be managed from a free mobile app for iOS and Android devices. The app is designed to let you fully manage the multicolor lights. Furthermore, you can create effects, apply timer, and switch the strings on or off.

Twinkly TWS600STP features the newest RGB 4.3mm diffused lens. LEDs are designed with a flat head to intensify light effects. You can also download great free effects from the online gallery.

Good quality for the price

30ft flexible rubber strand with 100 LED bulbs

Low voltage and no overheat, very safe for children

You need to be within 10m of the lights to control them from your phone

Check price

ELlight Outdoor String Lights are another great option to buy if you are looking for computer-controlled lights.

This one can be used outdoor if you have a tree in your yard, but also inside. It comes with a waterproof cord, power supply, and controller box, making it perfect even for outdoor use.

You can have more modes to switch to by using the app instead of the traditional remote. Thus, using the app LED Hue, you can choose an option from up to 120 dynamic color modes and various static solid colors.

Adjustable microphone that will sync with any music coming out of any other speaker

Mood lighting features premium 16 million RGB colors

Support Smart Life app

It comes with only 50 LEDs, quite small for bigger trees

Check price

Expert tip:

It works with both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi so it can be controlled in several ways. You can manage the modes in the traditional way, with the 40-keys IR remote. From the 3-button controller box, you can change static, dynamic, and MIC modes.

Additionally, with the Bluetooth POPOTAN app installed on your smartphone, you can control what the led lights can do. You can turn them on or off, set a timer, choose a scene, or change color and brightness.

Waterproof, it can be used inside or outside

LED with 16 million colors

It can be bend in any shape you need

Does not support 5GHz Wi-Fi

Check price

The Indoor String Lights from POPOTAN are an excellent option for cheap smart Christmas lights with many features.

It is a small string of only 33 feet long that features multiple control methods. It works with Alexa Echo and Google Assistant, allowing you to simply manage the lights using your voice. Moreover, you can use the POPOTAN or Smart Life app.

In addition, it has a built-in high-sensitivity microphone, LED light bar beating with ambient sound. Whether you want to use it for a party or computer games, you can sync the lights to the beat of any song.

Work with Alexa and Google Assistant

You can set each light bulb to emit different colors

Brightness and saturation can also be adjusted

Only Supports 2.4GHZ Wi-Fi

Check price

If you like big bulb lights, then VELTED Smart String Lights is the best choice for smart Christmas tree lights.

It is equipped with impact and weather-resistant G50 LED bulbs. All bulbs are IP65 waterproof, making them safe and protects them from moisture and water.

Besides being waterproof, the durable PET bulbs won’t break if dropped, stepped on, or in bad weather. You can safely use it indoors or outdoor, as you wish.

Bring some automation to your home by buying any of these perfect computer-controlled Christmas lights. The lights are the best part of the holidays, manage them comfortably from your phone or tablet.

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How To Draw A Christmas Tree In Python (3 Different Ways)

Drawing a Christmas tree with asterisks (*) in Python isn’t probably the most impressive Christmas present, but it offers a nice challenge that tests your understanding of loops.

This guide teaches you how to draw Christmas trees in Python in three different ways that incorporate loops and recursion.

Let’s jump into it!

Drawing Christmas Trees in Python

There are three main ways to draw Christmas trees in Python:

For loop

While Loop

Recursion

1. For Loop Approach

To draw a Christmas tree using asterisks (*) in Python, you can use a for loop to print the asterisks in the shape of a tree.

Here is a code example of how to do this:

# Function to draw a Christmas tree with a given height def draw_tree(height): # Loop through each row of the tree for i in range(1, height + 1): # Print the spaces before the asterisks on each row for j in range(height - i): print(" ", end="") # Print the asterisks on each row for j in range(2 * i - 1): print("*", end="") # Move to the next line print() # Call the function to draw a tree with a height of 5 draw_tree(5)

This piece of code defines a draw_tree() function. It takes a height as an argument and uses two nested for loops to print the asterisks in the shape of a Christmas tree.

The outer for loop iterates through each row of the tree.

The inner for loop prints the asterisks on each row.

The number of spaces before the asterisks and the number of asterisks on each row is calculated based on the height of the tree.

When you call the draw_tree() function and pass it a height, it will print a Christmas tree with the given height.

For instance, if you call draw_tree(5), it prints a Christmas tree like follows:

2. While Loop Approach

The for-loop approach is the simplest one to generate a Christmas tree in Python.

But it doesn’t mean you couldn’t do it with a while loop. More importantly, if you’re new to loops, you should definitely try reproducing the tree in the previous example using a while loop.

To draw a Christmas tree in Python, let’s use a while loop to print the asterisks in the shape of a tree.

Here’s what it looks like in the code:

# Function to draw a Christmas tree with a given height def draw_tree(height): # Set the initial values for the while loop i = 1 j = 1 # Loop while the row number is less than or equal to the height of the tree while i <= height: # Print the spaces before the asterisks on each row while j <= height - i: print(" ", end="") j += 1 # Reset the value of j j = 1 # Print the asterisks on each row while j <= 2 * i - 1: print("*", end="") j += 1 # Reset the value of j j = 1 # Move to the next line print() # Increment the value of i i += 1 # Call the function to draw a tree with a height of 5 draw_tree(15)

This piece of code defines a draw_tree() function that takes a height as an argument and uses two nested while loops to print the asterisks in the shape of a Christmas tree.

Once again, the outer loop iterates through each row of the tree, and the inner loop prints the asterisks on each row.

The number of spaces before the asterisks and the number of asterisks on each row is calculated based on the height of the tree.

When you call the draw_tree() function and pass it a height, it will print a Christmas tree with that height using asterisks (*).

For example, if you call draw_tree(15), it will print a Christmas tree with a height of 15:

3. Recursion Approach

Last but not least, let’s use a recursive approach for printing the Christmas tree.

In case you’re unfamiliar with recursion, it means that a function calls itself causing a loop-like code structure. If this is the first time you hear about recursion, you should read a separate article about the topic before proceeding. It takes a moment to wrap your head around recursion.

To draw a Christmas tree using asterisks (*) in Python, you can use a recursive function that takes the height and level of the tree as arguments, and prints the asterisks in the shape of a tree.

Here is an example of how to do this:

# Function to draw a Christmas tree with a given height and level def draw_tree(height, level): # Check if the level is equal to the height of the tree if level == height: # Return if the level is equal to the height return # Print the spaces before the asterisks on each row for j in range(height - level): print(" ", end="") # Print the asterisks on each row for j in range(2 * level - 1): print("*", end="") # Move to the next line print() # Call the function recursively with the next level draw_tree(height, level + 1) # Call the function to draw a tree with a height of 5 draw_tree(5, 1)

This code defines a draw_tree() function that takes a height and a level as arguments, and uses recursion to print the asterisks in the shape of a Christmas tree.

The function checks if the level is equal to the tree’s height, and returns if it is. If the level is not equal to the height, it prints the asterisks on the current level, then calls itself recursively with the next level.

When you call the draw_tree() function and pass it a height and a starting level (usually 1), it will print a Christmas tree with that height using asterisks (*).

For example, if you call draw_tree(5, 1), it will print a Christmas tree with a height of 5:

To clarify, if you set the level parameter to something else than 1, you will end up with a truncated Christmas tree. For example, calling draw_tree(15, 3) gives a result like this:

Summary

Today you learned how to draw a Christmas tree in Python by using asterisks (*).

To take home, there are many ways you can draw a Christmas tree. The critical point is it’s all about iteration. You have to create a loop (for, while, or recursive) that increases the number of asterisks (and spaces) the further you go. This gives rise to a shape that resembles a Christmas tree.

Thanks for reading. Happy coding!

Read Also

Diamond Pattern in Python

Haskell Program To Convert The Binary Number To Gray Code Using Recursion

In Haskel we can use recursion along with helper function toconvert the Binary number to Gray code. In the first example, we are going to use base case, (grayCode “” = “” and grayCode [x] = [x]) and recursive case, grayCode (x:y:xs) = x : grayCode (xs ++ [if x == y then ‘0’ else if x == ‘0’ then ‘1’ else ‘0’])). Where as in the second example, we are going to use two helper functions along with recursion.

Method 1: Converting the Binary number to Gray Code using recursion

In this method, the grayCode function is defined to handle three cases −

When the input string is empty, the function returns an empty string.

When the input string has only one character, the function returns the string unchanged.

When the input string has two or more characters, the function takes the first two characters, x and y, and uses them to calculate the next character in the Gray code. If x and y are equal, the next character is ‘0’. If x is ‘0’, the next character is ‘1’. Otherwise, the next character is ‘0’. The function then recursively calls itself with the rest of the string (xs), and the result of this recursive call is appended to the current character..

Algorithm

Step 1 − The user defined, grayCode function is defined with base and recursive case as,

grayCode "" = "" grayCode [x] = [x] grayCode (x:y:xs) = x : grayCode (xs ++ [if x == y then '0' else if x == '0' then '1' else '0']).

Step 2 − Program execution will be started from main function. The main() function has whole control of the program. It is written as main = chúng tôi the main function, a variable n is defined with the value “1101100111”, and the result of grayCode n is printed to the console. The output will be the Gray code representation of the binary number n.

Step 3 − The variable named, “n” is being initialized. It will hold the numbers which is to be converted to gray code from binary.

Step 4 − The resultant gray code number is printed to the console using ‘print’ function after the function is called.

Example 1

In this example, we define a function grayCode that converts a binary number to its corresponding Gray code representation using recursion.

grayCode “” = “” grayCode [x] = [x] grayCode (x:y:xs) = x : grayCode (xs ++ [if x == y then ‘0’ else if x == ‘0’ then ‘1’ else ‘0’])

main :: IO () main = do let n = “1101100111” print (grayCode n)

Output “1010100010” Method 2: Converting the Binary number to Gray Code using recursion with the help of two helper function

In this method, the grayCode function handles the case when the input string has only one character, and returns the string unchanged. When the input string has two or more characters, the function takes the first character and passes it, along with the rest of the string, to the grayCodeR function. The grayCodeR function calculates the next character in the Gray code representation using the current character and the previous character. If the current character and the previous character are equal, the next character is ‘0’. If the current character is ‘0’, the next character is ‘1’. Otherwise, the next character is ‘0’. The function then recursively calls itself with the rest of the string and the current character as the previous character.

Algorithm

Step 1 − The user defined, grayCode function is defined with base and recursive case as,

grayCode "" = "" grayCode [x] = [x] grayCode (x:xs) = x : grayCodeR (xs, x).

Step 2 − The helper functions are defined as,

grayCodeR ("", prev) = "" grayCodeR ([x], prev) = [if x == prev then '0' else '1'] grayCodeR (x:xs, prev) = (if x == prev then '0' else '1') : grayCodeR (xs, x).

Step 3 − Program execution will be started from main function. The main() function has whole control of the program. It is written as main = do. In the main function, a variable n is defined with the value “1101100111”, and the result of grayCode n is printed to the console. The output will be the Gray code representation of the binary number n.

Step 4 − The variable named, “n” is being initialized. It will hold the numbers which is to be converted to gray code from binary.

Step 5 − The resultant gray code number is printed to the console using ‘print’ function after the function is called.

Example 1

In this example, the recursive grayCode function uses two helper functions, grayCode and grayCodeR, to convert the binary number to its corresponding Gray code representation.

grayCode “” = “” grayCode [x] = [x] grayCode (x:xs) = x : grayCodeR (xs, x)

grayCodeR (“”, prev) = “” grayCodeR ([x], prev) = [if x == prev then ‘0’ else ‘1’] grayCodeR (x:xs, prev) = (if x == prev then ‘0’ else ‘1’) : grayCodeR (xs, x)

main :: IO () main = do let n = “1101100111” print (grayCode n)

Output “1010100010” Conclusion

In Haskell, the conversion of binary number to gray code number can be implemented using a recursive function that takes a binary number represented as a string, and returns its corresponding Gray code representation as a string. The function can perform the XOR operation on the bits and shift the binary number to the right, until all the bits have been processed.

Google Vs Microsoft Bing: A Detailed Comparison Of Two Search Engines

When it comes to optimizing a website, SEO professionals typically focus on Google. After all, it’s the world’s most popular search engine.

But what about Microsoft Bing? Is it worth optimizing your site for, as well?

Let’s see how these two search giants, Microsoft Bing (rebranded from simply ‘Bing’ in October 2023) and Google, compare.

Google vs. Microsoft Bing Market Share

One of the first distinctions between Microsoft Bing and Google is market share. According to Statista, in February 2023, Bing accounted for 6.7% of the global search market, while Google took 86.6%.

That’s pretty huge.

And while that may make it tempting to focus on Google alone, Microsoft Bing provides good conversions and has a user base that shouldn’t be ignored.

That 6.7% of search users accounts for millions who use Microsoft Bing every day.

It’s particularly important to optimize for Bing if you’re targeting an American audience. In fact, one-third of online queries in the U.S. are powered by Microsoft properties when you factor in Yahoo and voice searches.

Some have wondered over the years whether Bing is an acronym for “Because It’s Not Google.” I’m not sure how true that is, but the name does come from a campaign in the early 1990s for its predecessor, Live Search.

Another fun tidbit is that Ahrefs recently did a study on the Top 100 Bing searches globally and the #1 query searched was [Google].

Comparing Google vs. Microsoft Bing’s Functionality

From a search functionality perspective, the two search engines are similar, but Google offers more core features:

Feature Google  Microsoft Bing Text Search Yes Yes Video Search Yes Yes Image Search Yes Yes Maps Yes Yes News Yes Yes Shopping Yes Yes Books Yes No Flights Yes No Finance Yes No Scholarly Literature Yes No

How Google & Microsoft Bing Differ in Size of Index and Crawling

Google says:

“The Google Search index contains hundreds of billions of webpages and is well over 100,000,000 gigabytes in size.”

Even so, not even Google can crawl the entire web. That is just not going to happen.

Microsoft Bing hasn’t released similar figures. However, this search engine index size estimating website puts the Microsoft Bing index at somewhere between 8 to 14 billion web pages.

The two engines have shared a little about their approaches to web indexing.

Microsoft Bing says:

“Bingbot uses an algorithm to determine which sites to crawl, how often, and how many pages to fetch from each site. The goal is to minimize bingbot crawl footprint on your web sites while ensuring that the freshest content is available.”

Around the same time the above statement was made, John Mueller from Google said:

“I think the hard part here is that we don’t crawl URLs with the same frequency all the time. So some URLs we will crawl daily. Some URLs maybe weekly. Other URLs every couple of months, maybe even every once half year or so. So this is something that we try to find the right balance for, so that we don’t overload your server.”

Google has a mobile-first index, while Microsoft Bing takes a different stance and does not have plans to apply a mobile-first indexing policy.

Google has evolved into more than just a search engine with products like Gmail, Maps, Chrome OS, Android OS, YouTube, and more.

Microsoft Bing also offers email via Outlook, as well as other services like Office Online or OneDrive.

Unlike Google, however, it does not have its own operating system. Instead, it uses Windows Phone 8 or iOS on Apple devices.

Now, let’s take a look at where Bing is on par with Google – or superior.

Differences in User Interface & Tools

Google has a clean, simple interface that many people find easy to use.

So does Microsoft Bing, though; in my opinion, Bing is actually a little bit more visual.

Both search engines display useful information about related searches, images, companies, and news and do a great job of informing users of everything they need to know about a given topic.

SEO professionals love our tools and data.

Thankfully, both Google and Microsoft Bing have decent keyword research tools that offer insights into performance:

One area where I think Google falls behind is the data it provides in Google Search Console. If you want to learn how to use it, check out How to Use Google Search Console for SEO: A Complete Guide.

One of the cool feature sets in Microsoft Bing is the ability to import data from Google Search Console:

Another Microsoft Bing feature that I think beats Google is the fact that it provides SEO Reports.

According to Bing, these reports contain common page-level recommendations based on SEO best practices to improve your rankings.

The reports are automatically generated biweekly and provide tips as to what to work on or look into.

See A Complete Guide to Bing Webmaster Tools to learn more.

Microsoft Bing May Excel in Image Search Over Google

When it comes to image search, Microsoft Bing may have a leg up on Google by providing higher-quality images.

I like the filtering features in its image search, too, because you can turn titles off and search by image size, color, or type.

Test out Bing Visual Image Search, which allows you to do more with images. Check out its library of specialized skills to help you shop, identify landmarks and animals, or just have fun.

Then, see How Bing’s Image & Video Algorithm Works to learn more.

Google has more images available for viewing than Microsoft Bing. Make the most of it with the tips in A Guide to Google’s Advanced Image Search.

However, Microsoft Bing provides more detailed information about the image users are searching for.

How Microsoft Bing & Google Handle Video Search

Microsoft Bing provides a much more visual video search results page, including a grid view of large thumbnails.

Google’s video results are more standard, featuring a vertical list of small thumbnails.

As you can see from the screenshot of a movie search below, they include ratings and reviews, as well as the cast and even where you can watch the movie, which is great.

I did not get this experience with Google video search.

This is one area where Microsoft Bing definitely outperforms Google.

Map Listings on Both Search Engines Matter for Local SEO

Both engines have similar functionality for maps, including map listings and local listings in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Make sure you claim all your listings in both Microsoft Bing and Google and optimize your profile with business information, photos, proper categories, and links.

Accurate name, address, and phone number (NAP) information are key.

See A Complete Guide to Google Maps Marketing.

Optimizing for Google Search vs. Microsoft Bing

Google is primarily concerned with E.A.T: Expertise, Authority, and Trust.

Google Searches are powered by machine-based algorithms that take into account users’ previous search history and location when generating results.

This means that if a particular user wants to find something specific on Google, it will be much easier than on Microsoft Bing because Google has a more complete picture of who that person is before they type anything in the browser.

Google has always been a link-orientated search engine in which the quality of links still matters instead of quantity. Links are not as important on Microsoft Bing.

In my opinion, Microsoft Bing has always been focused on on-page optimization. It puts more weight on content that is well optimized, or that includes important on-page elements like titles, descriptions, URLs, and content.

Unlike Google, Microsoft Bing states in its webmaster guidelines that it incorporates social signals into its algorithm. That means you should also focus on Twitter and Facebook – including building good quality content on your site and social platforms – if you want to rank highly in Microsoft Bing.

Content is extremely important for both search engines. Always focus on high-quality content that satisfies the user’s informational need. By creating useful and relevant content, users will naturally love it and link to it.

So, for example, if I am looking for cars, you should show me valuable content on the topic: how I can buy a car, cost, maintenance, what the shopping experience is like, etc.

Both speed, mobile-friendliness, and proper tech infrastructure matter for both engines. However, Microsoft Bing focuses more on anchor text usage. Bing has been known to reward sites with matching anchor text for a page title, which was devalued by Google many years ago.

Make sure you check out these resources for optimizing for various search engines:

Google Search vs. Microsoft Bing: The Verdict

Both Microsoft Bing and Google satisfy the informational needs of millions of people every day.

They both offer opportunities for your brand to reach new users and put you in front of millions of qualified customers who are looking for information, products, and services.

Optimizing for both search engines is similar. Microsoft Bing is more focused on on-page optimization and incorporates social signals, while Google is more focused on E.A.T. and links.

Microsoft Bing has definitely improved over the last year and is more competitive with Google, especially in its unique features.

That’s why I recommend optimizing for both, to reach the lion’s share of internet searches and maximize visibility.

More Resources:

Image Credits

All screenshots taken by author, March 2023.

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