Trending February 2024 # How To Master The Customer Experience From Search To Transaction # Suggested March 2024 # Top 4 Popular

You are reading the article How To Master The Customer Experience From Search To Transaction updated in February 2024 on the website Kientrucdochoi.com. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested March 2024 How To Master The Customer Experience From Search To Transaction

When it comes to purchases, two things are critical: driving visitors to your website and ensuring a positive experience once they’re there.

On January 15, I moderated a sponsored Search Engine Journal webinar presented by Kameron Jenkins of Botify and Greg Batchelor of AB Tasty.

They shared how marketers can create the most relevant, optimized customer journey from discovery through to transaction.

Here’s a recap of the webinar presentation.

Search plays a big role in the customer experience.

If you think about your website as a unit made of a bunch of individual URLs, the sum of those parts represents 100% of your company’s website investment – in time, money, resources, and talent.

Botify’s 2023 study found that, sadly, Google is missing about 51% of those pages.

Now, there are plenty of reasons why you wouldn’t want Google crawling certain URLs, but this 51% number actually represents “compliant” pages – in other words, pages whose signals indicate that they DO want them crawled and indexed.

They respond with a 200 status code.

They are the canonical version.

They don’t have a noindex tag.

Etc.

These websites wanted Google to crawl those pages, yet Google was missing them.

Organizations that focus purely on the on-site experience are missing out on the massive conversion and revenue benefits that could come from adding more pages that you already have to the mix.

Focusing on SEO means you get more chances to convert – whether that be an ecommerce purchase, a lead gen form fill, or publisher paid subscription sign-ups.

The SEO Funnel + The Customer Experience

Here’s another way we can visualize the relationship between search and customers.

In purple, we have the SEO funnel, and the reason it’s represented as a funnel because each step is contingent on the one before it.

In yellow and orange next to it, we can see how each of those phases corresponds to a phase of the customer experience.

Having search engines crawl, render, and index your content is a prerequisite that has to happen before we have a hope of our potential customers finding that content via a search engine like Google or Bing and then converting on our site.

Crawl

In this first phase of the SEO funnel, it’s critical for SEOs (especially those that work on large sites) to focus on crawl budget optimizations like:

Using your chúng tôi file to keep Google away from unimportant/duplicate pages.

Linking to the final/preferred version of your key URLs in your content and sitemap.

Cutting back on other things that can take up Google’s time like slow page load fetching/rendering JavaScript resources.

Render

Speaking of JavaScript, Googlebot is now evergreen, meaning it can navigate more modern JavaScript languages as it updates with the latest Chromium.

Google knows that JavaScript is essential in the modern web, so they keep making improvements to better understand JavaScript sites.

That said, it’s important to always investigate for yourself. For example:

Look at your log files to see how often search engine bots are crawling your JavaScript resources.

Run an HTML-only crawl and then another with JavaScript to compare the two versions – you might find JavaScript-loaded links and content that you don’t need to load with JavaScript, making it easier for Google to access.

Index

The result of crawling and rendering improvements is more key pages added to Google’s index.

As you can see in the diagram above, those are the prerequisites for a potential customer to be able to find in you via search and buy from you. It can’t happen without those steps.

Rank

Once your content is in the search engine’s index, it qualifies to show up when our potential customers are searching.

At this phase, it’s important to ensure that you have content that matches the potential customer’s intent at all phases of their buyer’s journey.

This means:

Relevant informational content that helps them during their research phase.

High-quality content that helps them evaluate their options.

Compelling product/conversion pages that lead to purchases.

Make sure to look at your queries, because they can reveal a lot about your potential customer’s mindset and help you get not just more traffic, but more qualified traffic that’s likely to convert.

Rank

That means making sure:

You’re in a good position.

Have relevant and compelling title tags.

You’re zeroing in on pages with high impressions and position but low CTR.

This will get your potential customers, whose experience with your brand has started off-site and in the search engine, to take the leap onto your site where you can work on moving them toward action.

Why Are SEOs Talking About Customers & Revenue?

It may seem odd to some that customer experience and revenue are part of the SEO conversation.

For years, our success as SEOs has depended on metrics like what position we’re ranking in and how much organic traffic we’re getting.

But as SEO is maturing, and more organizations are demanding to see the return on their investments, we’re realizing the need to call SEO what it is… a means to an end.

SEO helps brands increase their purchases and revenue by helping more potential customers find them when they search, which is only possible because SEOs are working to get Google to crawl, render, index, and rank their content.

Another reason this conversation is happening is that the line between SEO and UX is blurring, and rightfully so.

Google wants to rank pages that provide an amazing experience to its users (a.k.a., your potential customers).

That means SEOs are starting to care more and more about traditionally UX-focused optimizations, which starts to bleed into CRO/digital experience territory.

Why Optimize the On-Site Experience?

SEO is great in that in a sense, if it’s done well, it’s already starting to personalize the website experience, in the sense that it’s attracting traffic with an intent that should match your website.

So, now that you’ve got all of this digital traffic, you need to think about their experience on your site. Why?

Consumers expect a LOT from the online customer experience, namely:

Seamlessness.

Relevance.

Choice.

Personalization.

And they want all this on your website.

To illustrate the point, studies have found that people make lasting judgments about a website design’s appeal in 500 ms (one-half of a second) or less. So that’s a pretty quick first impression.

What’s even more important is that this impression MATTERS – researchers went on to find that it sticks and influences later opinions about the usability and trustworthiness of the website or product.

You might be spending a lot of time, effort and money on driving what you hope is the right kind of traffic to your site, through SEO efforts and otherwise, only to have them make a split-second decision about your site, or else drop off later down the customer journey. These are high stakes.

As Econsultancy reports, companies like Netflix, Amazon or Uber (controversies aside) “have demonstrated how delivering a seamless experience can entirely disrupt traditional industries. In other words, millennials simply do not care about buying a car if there is an even more convenient way they can get from A to B.”

Well-processed experimentation and personalization campaigns can help minimize drop-off and help visitors actually convert into buyers.

A CX optimization platform such as AB Tasty can enable you to make easy, “cosmetic” changes using drag and drop editors to more complex back end tests using a server-side approach.

On-Site Optimization Ideas to Test

Animate the Search Bar

A/B Test Idea

Animate text in the search bar to drive more queries.

Targeting

All pages except checkout.

All users – Desktop.

Optimize Navigation on Mobile

A/B Test Idea

Display a sticky search bar underneath navigation bar.

Targeting

All mobile users.

Make Search More Visible

A/B Test

Change the design of the search bar to increase the search rate

Targeting

All pages

All users

When It Pays to Hide the Price

A/B/C Test

Hide prices on the product category pages to increase access to product pages and improve the conversion rate and AOV

Targeting

Product category pages

All users – All devices

Progress Bar on Cart Page

A/B Test

Add a progress bar reflecting remaining amount required to get free shipping

Targeting

Cart page

Desktop only

How Can SEO & On-Site Experience Teams Work Better Together? For Testing Teams

Ask your SEO team about searcher queries: Try using real searchers’ phrasing in your messaging tests to see if it improves conversions.

Ask your SEO team about top organic landing pages: Work with them to improve conversion rates on those pages.

Let the SEO team know about tests you’re planning and tell them about test results.

How to A/B Test Without Jeopardizing SEO

To avoid SEO issues during your A/B tests:

Do NOT exclude Google’s bot from your A/B tests.

Do NOT display pages that are too different from one another to your users.

It will be more difficult to identify which element(s) had a greater impact on the conversion rate.

Google may consider the two versions to be different and to interpret that action as a manipulation attempt. Losing ranking may result or, worst-case scenario, your site may be completely removed.

For Split Testing

Split testing is the most prone to error and can have a dramatic impact on your search engine ranking, namely your original page being removed from the Google index, and replaced by your variant page.

To avoid this, remember the following points:

Never block Google’s bots via your site’s chúng tôi file with the Disallow instruction or by adding the noindex command on your alternate pages.

Place a canonical attribute on the variant page and set the value to the original page.

Redirect visitors via a 302 or JavaScript redirection, both of which Google interprets as temporary redirects.

When a redirect test is completed, you must put into production the changes that have been shown to be useful.

Best Practices for Standard A/B Tests (JS Tag)

This type of A/B test does not harm your SEO efforts. While Google is perfectly capable of understanding JavaScript code, these changes will not be a problem if you do not try to trick it by showing it an initial content that is very different from that presented to users. Therefore, make sure that:

The number of elements called by the overlay is limited given the overall page and that the test does not overhaul the page’s structure or content.

The overlays do not delete or hide elements that are important for the page’s ranking and improve its legitimacy in the eyes of Google (text areas, title, images, internal links, etc.).

Only run the experiment as long as necessary. Google knows that the time required for a test will vary depending on how much traffic the tested page gets, but says you should avoid running tests for an unnecessarily long time as they may interpret this as an attempt to deceive, especially if you’re serving one content variant to a large percentage of your users.

Q&A

Here are just some of the attendee questions answered by Kameron Jenkins and Greg Batchelor.

Q: Does personalized content hurt your SEO ranking? Because personalized content means you show one visitor a version of the content but showing a different version of content to a different visitor.

A: It will not hurt your SEO ranking because the modifications are done on the front-end code. Google also encourages AB Testing — you can learn more in this article from Google!

Q: We’ve run into situations where the tags used to implement tests make the page load slowly and can even be considered a render-blocking resource. Is there any way to avoid that?

Q: How can you encourage Google to index all of your pages?

A: If you’re having trouble getting Google to index all your important pages, you may have a problem with crawl budget.

Google doesn’t have unlimited time and resources, so you should focus on making it as easy as possible for Google to find your important pages. That way, they don’t waste time on unimportant pages you don’t want indexed (e.g., non-canonical pages, facets, etc.).

Make sure your most important pages are in your sitemap and linked in your content.

Consider server-side rendering.

Block Googlebot from visiting unimportant pages via your chúng tôi file.

All these things can encourage Google to find and index your important pages.

A: If search engine bots are visiting unimportant parts of your e-commerce website (which you can see by looking at your log files) then it’s definitely a good idea to modify your chúng tôi file to keep them away from those sections.

If Google is visiting those pages, it means not only that searchers could find them, but also could mean that Google is missing out on your important pages because they’re wasting time on these ones.

Q: Does the Botify crawler need any kind of white-listing?

A: Botify can whitelist if needed. Whether that’s necessary or not is based on each individual client’s infrastructure.

For example, some sites have bot detection that might block specific crawlers, or block after too many requests are made.

[Video Recap] From Search to Transaction: How to Master the Customer Experience

Watch the video recap of the webinar presentation and Q&A session.

Or check out the SlideShare below.

Image Credits

In-Post Images: Botify

Join Us For Our Next Webinar! KPIs, Metrics & Benchmarks That Matter For SEO Success In 2023

Reserve my Seat

You're reading How To Master The Customer Experience From Search To Transaction

Why Customer Experience Journey Mapping Needs ‘Big Data’ To Succeed

CXJM is essential to help you lay down your plan of attack and start realizing the opportunities for delivering against customer experience objectives

It’s no secret that most marketers are on the same trajectory and curve when it comes to Customer Experience. Although some are further along the journey than others, almost all are heading towards the common goal of achieving a single customer view. Therefore, most will have also had some exposure to Customer Experience Journey Mapping (CXJM) in some way, shape or form.

As an approach, CXJM is essential to help you lay down your plan of attack and start realizing the opportunities for delivering against customer experience objectives.

When conducted properly, the process will give you a better understanding of what the experiences of your customers really are and how you can start to plan effective communications around them.

Part of my role is now leading the entire Journey Mapping process and, having trialled a number of approaches, I believe a CXJM is only completed by following these 4 clear stages:

Stage 1 – Empathy mapping – completed by core stakeholders, empathy mapping ends with a series of hypothesis on the audience’s experience to either prove or disprove

Stage 2 – Audience interviews – used to provide a series of rich, qualitative based insights in response to the hypothesis defined from the empathy mapping

Stage 4 – Extracting the moments of truth – what are the audience’s defining moments from within their overall experience? When you can answer this, you can define a clear role for communications in responding to them with the right content, message or action

By following this approach to CXJM you can really start to understand your audience’s ‘moments of truth’ – the points along their journey that cause pain or delight.

During the audience interview, the experiences that are captured are ‘conscious’ – people are recalling and retelling them. But what about capturing those ‘unconscious’ experiences? The ones that only online behaviour, and data, leaves behind as a digital footprint?

Validate with data

This is where overlaying a combination of quantitative and qualitative data comes into play. By adding Validate with Data into the aforementioned process (yes, it’s now a 5 stage process) means you can enrich and measure the moments of truth with some robust figures alongside the insights from the qualitative interviews.

Let’s be honest, one thing we all have far too much of is data (can I still hear an echo of “data is the new oil” from somewhen in 2012?).  This stage of the process puts all that data to good use and can also help inform what data you need to harvest (and why) moving forward.  The data you use to validate the experiences can vary on a case by case basis.  However, from my experience, the following are all a good place to start:

Search data – an absolute treasure trove of insights. Search data can provide you with what people are searching for, what questions they are asking, on what device and when they did it

Web analytics – often one of the largest sources of data. How are your audience accessing your website? What are they engaging with and what their ‘conversions’?

Heuristic assessments – an important qualitative analysis of both your owned properties and ideally those of your competitors

Why search data is so invaluable

Search data is only ever (really) analyzed by your SEO or Analytics team. However, when using search data as part of your CXJM process, search data really is ab-so-lutely invaluable. Quite simply, this is because people tell, or ask, Google the truth. People are happy to ask Google things they would not dream of asking anyone else. As their search intent becomes more clear through their logged queries, so too do the insights you can glean from them.

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, author of Everybody Lies, argues that: “for a variety of psychological reasons, Google search is one of the best places to source unbiased audience information”.

Putting this into practice – using CX journey mapping to help Londoners of their wellbeing journey

A project from the NHS in London called “Good Thinking” is a great case study where we have put this process into practice.

The overall objective of the project is to improve the mental health of Londoners by encouraging them to self-manage their wellbeing.  Our objective was to aggregate, structure and enrich existing research and understand how triggering contexts and experiences, associated with poor mental wellbeing, would translate digitally for the NHS.

With CXJM at its core, we followed our 5 stage process and used a combination of empathy and journey mapping, COM-B behavioural analysis, social listening and keyword research to uncover real conversations, trends, and patterns of behaviour.

The first step was to complete a series of empathy maps for the key intended audience groups. This activity involved stakeholders empathizing and mapping out needs, touchpoints, pain points and goals.

Next were the audience interviews, where the experiences of a group of Londoners was captured into ‘stories’. Their experiences were then mapped onto a CX journey map, which clearly indicated the blockers and challenges faced by them when trying to find the right information they needed online.

Now the moments of truth were known, we were able to use a combination of search and social data to add a sophisticated layer of information. We took the search data of millions of Londoners and were able to extract several learnings including:

What search terms are the most popular and common in relation to mental wellbeing

Which online touchpoints are people already using

What sort of information and content they are being presented with

The social data provided richer context, giving a clear direction on the appropriate tone of voice, plus a validation on which platforms were the best to reach the various cohorts on.

This research was carried out last year and, fast-forwarding to today, we have already reached hundreds of thousands of Londoners and encouraged many of them to access the online resources that the service has to offer – thus alleviating pressure the stretched physical NHS and saving them hundreds of thousands of pounds in the process.

Marrying experience mapping with robust search and social data really does allow you to create a successful digital service – whether it’s designed to help the health of Londoners or something more commercially minded.

For a more detail on this approach download Fresh Egg’s white paper, ‘Helping Londoners on the journey to mental wellbeing – a digital research project for the NHS’, to learn:

How to identify and understand the online behaviour, motivations and search intent of people, in relation to broad wellbeing conditions

Translating granular search data and broader trends into actionable insight

Recommendations on how you can digitally engage with people at different stages of their wellbeing journey

Taskus Enhances Customer Experience Of Leading On

According to Statista, the online food delivery market is set to accelerate from nearly US$17 billion in 2023 to more than US$24 billion in 2023. To cope up with the industry growth, an on-demand food delivery company is transforming the way goods move within cities by enabling anyone to have anything – specifically restaurant favourites – delivered on-demand. This significant platform connects local couriers with customers which can deliver everything from batteries to a complete meal for a crowd within minimal amount of wait time.  

Business Challenge

With the growth of the company, the demand for high quality customer service was also at the peak. It was hard to match the influx of inquiries received during the lunch and dinner demand spikes which led to cancelled orders and refunds on inaccurate or late orders by the company. Subsequently, this marked direct impact of revenue of the company and drove low CSAT scores. To manage the non-peak performance became too difficult. Additionally, the non-urgent inquiries including changing a credit card after payment, explaining a delivery fee, and reporting minor missing items such as utensils, did not get the same resolution sensitivity. Hence the requests were severely backlogged in the system.  

The Solution

TaskUs studied the historical data to tackle workforce and volume issues. It then translated the data to actionable resolutions to optimise peak and non-peak efficiency. The service provider also hosted weekly meetings to review assumptions, handle items, productivity and SLAs by ticket type and volume. Further, to manage non-peak demand, TaskUs analysed the backlog of support tickets and discovered that about 60 percent of open tickets were the same 25 questions. Therefore, TaskUs bucketed these tickets, wrote scripted answers and systematically cleared the queue. Post that the remaining queue was way more manageable. The service provider developed a part-time employee program to subsidize its full time workforce during peak demand hours. This led to increase in orders and reduction in refunds for inaccurate or late orders by providing enough teammates during peak hours to assist customers.  

Results

According to Statista, the online food delivery market is set to accelerate from nearly US$17 billion in 2023 to more than US$24 billion in 2023. To cope up with the industry growth, an on-demand food delivery company is transforming the way goods move within cities by enabling anyone to have anything – specifically restaurant favourites – delivered on-demand. This significant platform connects local couriers with customers which can deliver everything from batteries to a complete meal for a crowd within minimal amount of wait chúng tôi the growth of the company, the demand for high quality customer service was also at the peak. It was hard to match the influx of inquiries received during the lunch and dinner demand spikes which led to cancelled orders and refunds on inaccurate or late orders by the company. Subsequently, this marked direct impact of revenue of the company and drove low CSAT scores. To manage the non-peak performance became too difficult. Additionally, the non-urgent inquiries including changing a credit card after payment, explaining a delivery fee, and reporting minor missing items such as utensils, did not get the same resolution sensitivity. Hence the requests were severely backlogged in the system.TaskUs studied the historical data to tackle workforce and volume issues. It then translated the data to actionable resolutions to optimise peak and non-peak efficiency. The service provider also hosted weekly meetings to review assumptions, handle items, productivity and SLAs by ticket type and volume. Further, to manage non-peak demand, TaskUs analysed the backlog of support tickets and discovered that about 60 percent of open tickets were the same 25 questions. Therefore, TaskUs bucketed these tickets, wrote scripted answers and systematically cleared the queue. Post that the remaining queue was way more manageable. The service provider developed a part-time employee program to subsidize its full time workforce during peak demand hours. This led to increase in orders and reduction in refunds for inaccurate or late orders by providing enough teammates during peak hours to assist chúng tôi provided efficiency positioned TaskUs to be more agile to real time volume, and to continue to scale as its clients’ business grows.

How To Remove Date Snippets From Search Results?

Someone asked a great question in a recent Google SEO office-hours about preventing Google from showing published dates in the search result. Mueller recommended what to do in that situation where a date published should be prevented from showing in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Static Pages and Publication Dates

Normally Google doesn’t show the date a page like contact or about us doesn’t need to show the publication date.

So if a publisher sees a publication date in the search results it may be evidence of something unexpected in the code that should be removed.

John Mueller provides suggestions on what to do to solve the problem.

Question About Removing Date Snippets

The person asking the question wanted to know how to remove the dates.

This is the question:

“How would you remove date snippets appearing in the search results for static pages like home, services, contact, etc.?”

There is No Date Snippet Meta Tag

Google’s Mueller answered that there is no HTML method to communicate the preference for the date snippet feature.

For example, Google obeys a meta tag called, noarchive. The noarchive meta tag tells Google to not link to a cache of the web page.

There is also a nosnippet meta tag that tells Google not to show a text snippet or video review in Google’s search engine results pages.

But there is no meta tag for telling Google to not show a date snippet from the page.

Google’s John Mueller paused a moment, looking up as he searched for answer.

Then he turned to the camera and said:

“So… we don’t have a meta tag to remove dates in particular from pages that we show in the search results.

Usually we try to understand when it makes sense to show a date on a page.

And we’ll try to show that in the snippet of the search results itself.”

How to Show Specific Dates in Search Snippets

Mueller next said how to specify the right date in Google’s date snippets in the search results.

“If there’s a specific data that you want to have shown, then you can use… I think… the date structured data in the article structured data type, I think… where you can tell use which date we should use there.

So if you do have a date, you can tell us there.

If you don’t tell use there then we’ll look at the content itself to try to find a date within that.”

How to Not Show a Date in the SERPs?

Mueller next suggests ideas of how to diagnose why Google might be showing a date snippet for static pages like the About Us page in the search results.

Mueller said:

“If you don’t want a date to be shown, then it’s not possible to suppress that date snippet from being shown.

But what you could do is, of course, make sure that there is no date shown on your page.

So if you don’t have any dates in the HTML page, then we don’t really have much to pick up on to show there.

So especially when you’re talking about things like a home page or a contact page, for the most part you probably don’t have dates on there anyway.

So that should be something where you shouldn’t see that too frequently.

If you do see this on pages where you’d say well… it’s a normal Contact Us page, why is Google ever showing any dates there, then I would love to have examples of that.

So in particular a query where you’re seeing that happen and the URLs from your site where that’s happening from.

So that’s something that we can take up with the team here that works on showing dates and recognizing dates on a page.

Where we can say, well maybe we’re recognizing a phone as a date accidentally and we need to be able to fix that.”

Make Sure No Published Date in HTML

What may be useful, according to John Mueller is to check out your published HTML page and in your browser select to “view code” in order to see if there’s something there that is sending date information to Google.

And if you find some published date information in the HTML code that you don’t want published in Google’s SERPs then the next step would be to find out what’s part of your code is generating that date and remove it.

Citations Watch Google’s John Mueller Answer  Date Snippets Question

How To Improve Customer Service On Your E

3. Be clear.

According to Magicdust, a full-service internet marketing and web design firm, “Unhappy customers are unfortunately inevitable in any kind of business. To avoid any conflict, include as much information on orders as possible.” This means providing detailed information on such matters as shipping and return policies, warranties, guarantees, and other information that could affect a customer’s experience.

4. Invest in quality site search.

Much of your customer service relates to how you design your e-commerce site. To keep customers happy and convert shoppers, invest heavily in high-quality site search functionality. This will help to keep customers satisfied, and you will avoid unnecessary interactions that waste your time.

FYI

Great e-commerce customer service means making your online store’s search function highly user-friendly.

5. Provide valuable follow-up.

We’ve all received those annoying emails from companies after we’ve purchased one thing from their site. Don’t be that company. Instead of sending lazy promotions for months after a purchase, shoot out valuable deals and offers immediately after they buy. Shoppers are more likely to convert when you are still fresh in their mind. Additionally, good deals and free offers show you care about keeping them as a customer.

6. Offer free shipping.

One of the best e-commerce customer service tactics is to offer free shipping. It costs you a couple of extra dollars, but it goes a long way in impressing customers and persuading them to make that first purchase (and maybe others down the road).

7. Improve customer interactions.

Although your team has the skill set necessary to interact with customers, they also need to relate to the customer. For instance, try to identify common ground with the customer, such as shared interests. This step helps your team members to understand conflict and humanizes the rep-staff relationship for the customer.

8. Follow up after the problem has been solved.

It is essential that customers feel as though you were on their side when a problem occurred, so follow up to ensure the issue was fully resolved and that the customer is satisfied with the service. You can do this through an email or a customer feedback survey – the goal is to let the customer know you are on their side.

9. Actively listen to the customer.

When you’re talking with customers, it’s important to clarify and rephrase what they are saying to make sure you understand them correctly. Showing empathy and reflecting their feelings will also help you turn the conversation in the right direction.

10. Be available.

Part of the personal touch necessary for customer satisfaction is making sure your customers can reach you. For instance, if you’re in different time zones, be available on their time. This will help to build their trust and remind them that your business isn’t programmed.

Customer service may not be most companies’ favorite activity, but it should be a major point of emphasis. When you’re looking for ways to improve your e-commerce site, analyze your customer service and look for areas where you can improve.

How does customer service for e-commerce differ from brick-and-mortar?

There are some key differences between e-commerce and brick-and-mortar customer service.

Face-to-face interaction: E-commerce inherently lacks the face-to-face interactions that define brick-and-mortar storefronts. Good e-commerce customer service teams attempt to replicate this face-to-face structure and value. Phone calls, live chat and chatbots are some tools an e-commerce business might use to achieve this goal.

Opening hours: Brick-and-mortar stores have set opening hours, so their employees aren’t typically expected to interact with customers after hours. The internet runs 24/7, though, so consumers may contact you around the clock. As a result, you might quickly find yourself behind on replying to customer emails, texts and the like.

High expectations: Since e-commerce giants like Amazon have branded themselves on excellent customer service, many consumers may also expect the same level of care from smaller e-commerce businesses. This expectation poses a substantial challenge for small e-commerce businesses. Falling behind on customer communications is almost inevitable with a tiny staff, yet it has greater consequences for an e-commerce business than for a standard retail storefront.

Bottom Line

E-commerce customer service lacks the in-person interactions of brick-and-mortar customer service, and it often comes with higher customer expectations and nonstop communication.

What is the value of customer service?

Whether you realize it or not, customer service plays a significant role in most purchases you make. Think about when you’re looking to buy a particular item that multiple brands sell for roughly the same price. What sets the one you select apart from the ones you pass up? While brand equity and familiarity often play a role, it often comes down to how quickly you’ll get the product, what support it comes with, and how comfortable you are with the brand.

Each of these aspects falls under customer service and indicates the importance of selling service to customers instead of just products.

Drew Hendricks contributed to the writing and research in this article.

Word Master Class: How To Make Custom Interactive Forms

Custom interactive forms are one of Word’s most sophisticated tricks. More than a simple design tool, the form tools let you collect specific information and export to Excel, Access, or XML.

Start in the Developer tab

Rich Text Content Control: contains a block of text (including attributes) plus additional content types such as tables, images, or other content controls.

Plain Text Content Control: contains just plain text—that is, no other content controls, images, or tables. Attributes are included, but only one attribute is applied to the entire text control; e.g., if you underline one word, all the text is underlined.

Picture Content Control: This one, obviously, contains images.

Check Box: Use this to solicit a yes/no type of response (selected is generally yes, and not -elected is no).

Combo Box: Use this control to provide users with a list of selectable items plus an option to add/enter their own responses, which are not included in the list.

Drop Down List: a pre-programmed group of items, which users can select from a list.

Date Picker: Use this to select a date from a pop-up calendar.

Repeating Section Content Control: Use this control to enter repetitive content (e.g., to repeat parts of a table, text, etc.) including other content controls.

Legacy Tools: Theseform field types were available in previous versions of Word; that is, Word 97 through 2003. You can still use them in Word 2013, but these forms must be saved in one of the previous legacy formats (i.e., Word 1997 or Word 2003).

Create a form

We’ll create a simple application, with questions that must be filled out or selected from a list of options. 

First, select the application type you want to create, then decide which questions (or fields) you want to ask your audience. For this exercise, let’s try an application for auditions for the play Peter Pan. Use the following fields/questions.

Name (Plain Text)

Date of Birth (Date Picker)

Sex (Check Box)

Part Auditioning For (Drop Down List)

Talents (Combo Box)

Why do you want this part? (Rich Text)

Note: Except for the attributes, most designers skip this section.

5. Move to the fifth field: Talents. Press a few tabs to align with the field above, then select the Combo Box button. The Combo Box functions exactly like a List Box except, in addition to a list of items, users can add their own custom items. The Properties dialog is exactly the same as the Drop Down List dialog, with Add, Modify, and Remove buttons.

Note: The maximum number of items allowed in a single Drop Down or Combo list is 25.

Once the form is complete, consider adding some creative formatting such as artistic borders, shading, and unique fonts. Our example shows six different borders to illustrate the various options that are available, but obviously you’d select just one or two styles for an actual form.

Add borders, colors and more

Highlight each field separately to add a border and/or shading around each application question. To add a single border around the entire form, press Ctrl+A to select all the text. 

3. Notice the options on the right side of this dialog box under Preview. Use these icons to add or remove the selected border from the top, bottom, left, right, or center of the target area.

Update the detailed information about How To Master The Customer Experience From Search To Transaction on the Kientrucdochoi.com website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!