Trending February 2024 # How To Secure Erase A Mac Ssd / Hard Disk From Recovery Mode # Suggested March 2024 # Top 9 Popular

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This is very much a workaround, as you’ll technically be erasing the drive twice in the process. The first time will not be the secure erase, it’s the second time formatting that will allow you to achieve the desired outcome. For users with an SSD drive, it’s important to note that using the secure formatting options like 7 pass and 35 pass could potentially lead to a reduction in drive life span, or performance degradation, though TRIM is thought to mitigate that risk. Be sure you understand that and are comfortable with that potential before proceeding.

Secure Format an SSD (or the OS X Boot Disk) via Recovery Mode

The newest Macs ship with a Recovery partition rather than a separate external reinstall disk, and if you’ve ever rebooted a newer Mac, iMac, MacBook Air, or MacBook Pro with an SSD from the Recovery partition to reformat the drive, you may have noticed that by default the “Security Options” button is greyed out in the Disk Utility options, seemingly preventing a standard “secure” erase procedure. The precise reason for this isn’t entirely clear, though some speculate it’s because writing 1’s and 0’s to an SSD can lead to performance degradation and a reduction in the drives lifespan, and that it persists even in the most recent versions of OS X suggests it’s not just a bug. Nonetheless, many users want the option for secure removal of data from the SSD. The most obvious solution to this problem is to boot the Mac from an external boot drive ( here’s how to make one for Mountain Lion ), but that isn’t always an option for everyone, but fortunately there is a workaround that lets you perform a secure erase directly from the Recovery partition chúng tôi is very much a workaround, as you’ll technically be erasing the drive twice in the process. The first time will not be the secure erase, it’s the second time formatting that will allow you to achieve the desired outcome. For users with an SSD drive, it’s important to note that using the secure formatting options like 7 pass and 35 pass could potentially lead to a reduction in drive life span, or performance degradation, though TRIM is thought to mitigate that risk. Be sure you understand that and are comfortable with that potential before proceeding.

Though it may be obvious, it’s important to point out and to remember that this process removes all data from the drive, which then becomes unrecoverable due to the highly secure formatting options. Always back up important data before formatting a drive, or else it will be gone forever.

Reboot the MacBook and hold down the OPTION key, then select the Recovery partition

At the OS X Utilities menu, choose “Disk Utility”

Select the hard drives primary partition (usually called Macintosh HD) from the left, then choose the “Erase” tab

Under “Format” choose “Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted) – the “Encrypted” part is crucial

Choose “Erase” and set a password for the encrypted partition, for now choose a simple password that’s easy to remember, then choose “Erase”

Let the drive erase and turn into an encrypted format, this process can take a while depending on the drive type, size, and speed

Now select the partition in Disk Utility again, and from the “Erase” tab choose “Mac OS Extended (Journaled)”

Choose “OK” and let the secure erase proceed, when finished you will have a blank primary partition that has been securely formatted

The Macs hard drive has now been securely erased, entirely from the built-in Recovery partition, and without the need of an external boot drive or disk. At this point you may want to repair the disk since you’re already booted into Recovery, or you can exit out of Disk Utility and re-install a clean version of OS X on the Mac if desired, or do whatever else you want with your newly blank hard drive space.

Note, this does not remove the Recovery partition. You can do that separately if desired, but it is not recommended as you will be unable to restore OS X or boot into Recovery mode once it has been removed, thereby requiring the usage of an external boot disk to install Mac OS X back onto the machine.

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How To Secure Erase Free Space On Mac Drives With Os X El Capitan

Many Mac users running a modern version of OS X El Capitan have noticed the Secure Erase Free Space feature has gone missing from Disk Utility. What the “Erase Free Space” feature did (and still does in prior versions of Mac OS X) was overwrite the free space on a drive to prevent file recovery, adding a layer of security and privacy to file removal, much in the way that Secure Empty Trash performed a similar function of overwriting data after removal.

For those wondering, these features were removed from the modern version of Disk Utility in Mac OS X because they do not work on SSD volumes, which are becoming more commonplace and nearly all Mac laptops ship with them by default now. But not everyone has an SSD drive, and thus some users may still wish to perform a secure erase of free space on their Mac hard disk. To achieve the same secure erase in modern versions of Mac OS X you’ll need to turn to the command line. And yes, this works to erase free space on older versions of Mac OS X too, but since they can do the same task with Disk Utility it’s perhaps a bit less relevant to the prior releases.

How to Secure Erase Free Space on Mac OS X El Capitan Drives via Command Line, Without Disk Utility

Back up your Mac before attempting to use these commands. The command line requires precise syntax and is unforgiving, improper commands could lead to the unintended removal of data you do not want to delete, permanently, as this is a secure erase function. You have been warned, so backup your Mac data first, then proceed at your own risk.

To get started, launch the Terminal (found in /Applications/Utilities/) and use the following general syntax, replacing level and drive name as appropriate:

diskutil secureErase freespace (level 0-4) /Volumes/(Drive Name)

(level 0-4) is a number indicating the number of passes to write to the free space, ‘freespace’ indicates you are erasing only the free space and not the entire drive itself – a critically important difference – and (Drive Name) is self explanatory. Users can also choose the disk identifier if desired. If you aren’t sure of the name of the drive, using diskutil list will show you all mounted drives and partitions. If the drive in question has a space in the name, you should place it in quotes or escape it with backslashes.

For example, to perform a secure erase with 35 passes on free space on a drive named “Macintosh HD” you could use the following command string:

diskutil secureErase freespace 3 "/Volumes/Macintosh HD"

Hitting return will instantly begin the secure erase of any free space. This is irreversible, so as we’ve mentioned a dozen times already, be sure the syntax is exact.

verbs. Ownership of the affected disk is required.

Level should be one of the following:

o 0 – Single-pass zero-fill erase.

o 1 – Single-pass random-fill erase.

o 2 – US DoD 7-pass secure erase.

o 3 – Gutmann algorithm 35-pass secure erase.

o 4 – US DoE algorithm 3-pass secure erase.

That’s all there is to it, and this is how you can continue to erase free disk space on a Mac running OS X El Capitan or later with the newly limited Disk Utility. Another option is to use an old version of Disk Utility in modern versions of Mac OS X, either from a boot drive or recovery mode, of an older Mac OS release, or with the application itself, but that is generally not recommended.

And yes, this works on both standard hard disk drives with spinning platters, and modern SSD disks, though with an SSD drive the feature is less relevant as TRIM / garbage collection should handle the file removal on it’s own. For SSD volumes, a better option is to enable and use FileVault disk encryption on the Mac, which encrypts data on the drive making it unrecoverable without the FileVault key, thus obviating the need to securely erase free space on the volume.

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How To Boot Into Karbonn Titanium S19 Recovery Mode

What is Recovery?

A recovery is a separate bootable partition on your Android device that you can use to install system updates and repair (factory reset) your device. A lot more can be done using a custom recovery, but the stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your Android device is limited to these features only. And FYI, these features are integrated into the Android OS as well — when you chose to factory reset your device from device settings or install an OTA update, your device reboots and boots into the stock recovery to finish the job.

The stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your device doesn’t support touchscreen mechanism. You’ll have to use the Power and Volume buttons available on your device to select and navigate between options in the recovery.

There are multiple methods to boot your Karbonn Titanium S19 in recovery mode. The most handy (and hardware coded) method is about pressing a combination of keys for a few seconds on your Karbonn Titanium S19 . Others are software based, let’s have a look them below:

1) Boot into Karbonn Titanium S19 Recovery Mode Using 

HARDWARE BUTTONS

This method is a fail-proof method that’ll always work for you, unless you’ve broken one of hardware keys. In such a case you’d be left with only the other two methods discussed below.

Power off your device and wait 4-5 seconds after lights go off.

└ In recovery, use Volume Up and Down keys to navigate between options and Power key to select an option.

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2) Boot into Karbonn Titanium S19 Recovery Mode Using 

ADB

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ADB stands for Android Debug Bridge, a tool used to send terminal commands to a Android device via a PC command line. ADB requires a bit of setup, but it gets the job done with much lesser effort than hardware buttons, so pretty useful in cases when you’ve to boot in recovery mode frequently. Also, if (for some reason) your hardware buttons aren’t working than this is a very good alternative to boot into recovery mode.

And make sure you’ve proper drivers installed for your device. You can download driver from this page →

Extract the file (ADB chúng tôi you downloaded from the link above to a separate folder on your computer

Prepare your phone

Enable developer options: Go to your phone’s Settings » select About phone » Scroll to the bottom and tap on “Build number” seven times to enable developer options

Enable USB Debugging: Open phone’s Settings » select Developer options » Tick the “USB debugging” checkbox (under Debugging section)

└ If the script shows any error than that means either your device is not connected or you don’t have proper driver for your device installed on your PC. For help with driver, check this page →

FYI, the ‘Boot into Recovery Mode.bat‘ script file that we used above to boot your device into recovery mode just uses one line of command:

adb reboot recovery

If you already have ADB setup on your computer and you know how to use it, then you may just use the command given above to boot into recovery mode.

3) Boot into Karbonn Titanium S19 Recovery Mode Using 

Quick Boot (Reboot) APP

Yes! There’s an app for rebooting your phone into recovery mode, and it’s the most easier of the methods we discussed above. But it won’t work unless you’ve root access on your device, and since not everyone roos their device, we’ve put this as the last method here.

ROOT ACCESS REQUIRED

Open the app and grant Root Access

Select ‘Recovery‘ from the list of options and it’ll boot your device into recovery mode

That’s all.

How To Boot Into Samsung Galaxy Grand Quattro Recovery Mode

A recovery is a separate bootable partition on your Android device that you can use to install system updates and repair (factory reset) your device. A lot more can be done using a custom recovery, but the stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your Android device is limited to these features only. And FYI, these features are integrated into the Android OS as well — when you chose to factory reset your device from device settings or install an OTA update, your device reboots and boots into the stock recovery to finish the job.

The stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your device doesn’t support touchscreen mechanism. You’ll have to use the Power and Volume buttons available on your device to select and navigate between options in the recovery.

There are multiple methods to boot your Galaxy Grand Quattro in recovery mode. The most handy (and hardware coded) method is about pressing a combination of keys for a few seconds on your Galaxy Grand Quattro. Others are software based, let’s have a look them below:

1) Boot into Galaxy Grand Quattro Recovery Mode Using 

HARDWARE BUTTONS

This method is a fail-proof method that’ll always work for you, unless you’ve broken one of hardware keys. In such a case you’d be left with only the other two methods discussed below.

└ This is completely optional. You can choose to keep the device switched On if you wish to

Press and hold  ‘Volume Up + Home + Power’ buttons together and release them as soon as you see the Galaxy Grand Quattro logo on your phone’s screen.

Your phone will boot into recovery mode. Use Volume buttons to navigate Up and Down between options and use Power button to select an option in recovery.

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2) Boot into Galaxy Grand Quattro Recovery Mode Using 

ADB

[ad1]

ADB stands for Android Debug Bridge, a tool used to send terminal commands to a Android device via a PC command line. ADB requires a bit of setup, but it gets the job done with much lesser effort than hardware buttons, so pretty useful in cases when you’ve to boot in recovery mode frequently. Also, if (for some reason) your hardware buttons aren’t working than this is a very good alternative to boot into recovery mode.

And make sure you’ve proper drivers installed for your device. You can download driver from this page →

Extract the file (ADB chúng tôi you downloaded from the link above to a separate folder on your computer

Prepare your phone

Enable developer options: Go to your phone’s Settings » select About phone » Scroll to the bottom and tap on “Build number” seven times to enable developer options

Enable USB Debugging: Open phone’s Settings » select Developer options » Tick the “USB debugging” checkbox (under Debugging section)

└ If the script shows any error than that means either your device is not connected or you don’t have proper driver for your device installed on your PC. For help with driver, check this page →

FYI, the ‘Boot into Recovery Mode.bat‘ script file that we used above to boot your device into recovery mode just uses one line of command:

adb reboot recovery

If you already have ADB setup on your computer and you know how to use it, then you may just use the command given above to boot into recovery mode.

3) Boot into Galaxy Grand Quattro Recovery Mode Using 

Quick Boot (Reboot) APP

Yes! There’s an app for rebooting your phone into recovery mode, and it’s the most easier of the methods we discussed above. But it won’t work unless you’ve root access on your device, and since not everyone roos their device, we’ve put this as the last method here.

ROOT ACCESS REQUIRED

Open the app and grant Root Access

Select ‘Recovery‘ from the list of options and it’ll boot your device into recovery mode

That’s all.

How To Boot Into Karbonn A1 Plus Champ Recovery Mode

What is Recovery?

A recovery is a separate bootable partition on your Android device that you can use to install system updates and repair (factory reset) your device. A lot more can be done using a custom recovery, but the stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your Android device is limited to these features only. And FYI, these features are integrated into the Android OS as well — when you chose to factory reset your device from device settings or install an OTA update, your device reboots and boots into the stock recovery to finish the job.

The stock recovery that comes pre-installed on your device doesn’t support touchscreen mechanism. You’ll have to use the Power and Volume buttons available on your device to select and navigate between options in the recovery.

There are multiple methods to boot your Karbonn A1 PLUS CHAMP in recovery mode. The most handy (and hardware coded) method is about pressing a combination of keys for a few seconds on your Karbonn A1 PLUS CHAMP . Others are software based, let’s have a look them below:

1) Boot into Karbonn A1 PLUS CHAMP Recovery Mode Using 

HARDWARE BUTTONS

This method is a fail-proof method that’ll always work for you, unless you’ve broken one of hardware keys. In such a case you’d be left with only the other two methods discussed below.

Power off your device and wait 4-5 seconds after lights go off.

└ In recovery, use Volume Up and Down keys to navigate between options and Power key to select an option.

[ad1]

2) Boot into Karbonn A1 PLUS CHAMP Recovery Mode Using 

ADB

[ad1]

ADB stands for Android Debug Bridge, a tool used to send terminal commands to a Android device via a PC command line. ADB requires a bit of setup, but it gets the job done with much lesser effort than hardware buttons, so pretty useful in cases when you’ve to boot in recovery mode frequently. Also, if (for some reason) your hardware buttons aren’t working than this is a very good alternative to boot into recovery mode.

And make sure you’ve proper drivers installed for your device. You can download driver from this page →

Extract the file (ADB chúng tôi you downloaded from the link above to a separate folder on your computer

Prepare your phone

Enable developer options: Go to your phone’s Settings » select About phone » Scroll to the bottom and tap on “Build number” seven times to enable developer options

Enable USB Debugging: Open phone’s Settings » select Developer options » Tick the “USB debugging” checkbox (under Debugging section)

└ If the script shows any error than that means either your device is not connected or you don’t have proper driver for your device installed on your PC. For help with driver, check this page →

FYI, the ‘Boot into Recovery Mode.bat‘ script file that we used above to boot your device into recovery mode just uses one line of command:

adb reboot recovery

If you already have ADB setup on your computer and you know how to use it, then you may just use the command given above to boot into recovery mode.

3) Boot into Karbonn A1 PLUS CHAMP Recovery Mode Using 

Quick Boot (Reboot) APP

Yes! There’s an app for rebooting your phone into recovery mode, and it’s the most easier of the methods we discussed above. But it won’t work unless you’ve root access on your device, and since not everyone roos their device, we’ve put this as the last method here.

ROOT ACCESS REQUIRED

Open the app and grant Root Access

Select ‘Recovery‘ from the list of options and it’ll boot your device into recovery mode

That’s all.

How To Format And Partition An External Hard Drive Or Ssd On Windows

Windows is pretty good with hard disk and SSD file systems. While you may think that you’re stuck with the same partitions and format your hard disk came with, Windows will let you change things up as per your preference. It’s not too complicated, either. Here’s how to format and partition an external hard drive or SSD on Windows.

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What you need to know about partitioning and formatting

How to format an external hard drive on Windows

How to partition an external hard drive on Windows

What you need to know about partitioning and formatting

You might have heard “partitioning” and “formatting” used in the context of hard drives and OS. But what do these terms actually mean?

What does partitioning mean?

“Partitioning” refers to the process of dividing a disk into several sub-devices, and allocating sub-devices to the OS to allow it to carry out functions in the rest of the sub-devices and computer. So, for instance, you can have one 500GB drive, and have it partitioned into one 100GB drive partition to boot Windows out of (and the OS will create all the other requisite partitions for recovery, etc.), and the other 400GB drive partition to store your programs and files.

Why should you partition a drive?

What does formatting mean?

“Formatting” refers to the process of preparing a storage disk for its initial data storage use. More commonly, formatting refers to the process of generating a new file system for that particular storage disk. Think of the file system as an index that figures out what file can and will be stored where — without this index, the OS would be unable to see empty and used spaces. So formatting a drive essentially tells the drive where it can and cannot store data, and that it is ready to accept data in the first place.

Difference between format and quick format

Aamir Siddiqui / Android Authority

When you start a formatting operation, you will often see the option to do a quick format. A quick format essentially removes the index but not the files. As a result, one cannot see the files that exist on the drive, but the files still continue to exist and can be recovered through specialized software. In other words, the files on the disk are just marked “safe to overwrite” without actually being overwritten. A quick format also skips scanning of bad sectors on the disk, but this concept is outside the scope of this article.

A regular format or full format is different from a quick format in that it overwrites the files with blank data in addition to removing the index. This ensures that it becomes almost impossible to recover the file. A full format also scans the drive for bad sectors. Because of the wider scope of the task, a full format takes significantly longer than a quick format.

Why should you format a drive?

As mentioned, formatting a drive is a step towards using a drive for storage. Different OSs use different file systems for storage. So formatting your drive with the correct Windows-supported filesystem will allow you to use the drive on your computer without any further hassle. Without the correct file system in place, your Windows computer likely won’t see the drive as available for storage. Note that formatting a drive will delete your data, and a full format will make the data almost irrecoverable.

How to format an external hard drive on Windows

Formatting an external hard drive or SSD on Windows is quite simple.

Connect the external drive to your PC and open Windows Explorer.

Rename the drive under Volume label, if you wish to.

If you want the drive to be formatted more thoroughly, uncheck the Quick Format box.

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

Windows will format your external drive, and give you a confirmation dialog box when the formatting is complete.

To partition an external drive on Windows, you’ll need to use the Disk Management tool.

Find your external drive listed in the grid view in the bottom half.

To create a new partition, you will need unallocated space. You will see this under a black header in the Disk Manager.

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

The Shrink Volume dialog box will pop up. In the box next to Enter the amount of space to Shrink in MB, type in how much space you want for your new partition(s).

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

It will take a couple of seconds, but the partition will show up in the grid view of your external disk in Disk Manager.

Palash Volvoikar / Android Authority

If you want to create another partition, you can repeat the process to create a new volume with the allocated space you left before, or repeat the whole process by shrinking existing partitions.

FAQs

There are no downsides to partitioning your external hard disk. It depends upon what kind of usage you want from your external hard disk. It’s good to partition it if you want to use the hard disk for two different purposes and don’t want to mix up your files.

It’s not a necessary thing. It solely depends upon your usage and whether the usage warrants having partitions for different purposes.

Yes, Disk Management in Windows lets you do that. You will need unallocated space available if you want to extend a partition, and if you’re shrinking a partition, it will leave you with unallocated space that you can use to extend other partitions.

A full format of the hard drive erases the data on it irrecoverably. However, a quick format merely deletes the files, leaving them recoverable with specialized software.

You should check if your hard drive has any partitions for an OS you no longer need, through disk management. This will also bring to light any unallocated space. Then partition the drive as needed for the new usage, and format it with the filesystem needed.

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