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If you’re a blogger like me, there’ll be many times when you’ll need to convert an image from one format to another. One of the useful tools that most professionals use is Photoshop. The thing is, Photoshop is really expensive, and so are a number of other programs that can perform this function. If you are using Mac, you can easily use the built-in tool – Preview – to convert images. Here’s how.

Most of you might already know of and have used Preview before, but for those who don’t, Preview is Apple’s default utility for viewing images and PDF files on your Mac. One of the options it includes is the ability to export an image to a different file format.

To do this, simply open the image you want to convert in Preview, and follow the steps below:

1. Open up the File menu. From the drop-down menu, choose “Export.”

2. From the “Format” menu select the format you want to convert your image to.

By default, the format window will only include options for JPEG, JPEG-2000, OpenEXR, PDF, PNG (default selection), and TIFF. However, by holding down the “Option” key, it will bring up a number of other formats including GIF, ICNS, Microsoft BMP, Microsoft ICON, Photoshop, SGI, and TGA.

If you want to convert a batch of images together, you won’t want to do it one by one. Instead, to batch convert all of the photos together, follow the steps below:

1. Select all the images you want to convert. To do this, either hold-down “Shift” or “Command” while selecting the photos.

3. Once Preview is open, you’ll note that all the images will be shown in a list next to the displayed image, similar to the screenshot below:

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

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How To Navigate Mail Messages With The Keyboard In Mac Os X

To use keyboard email navigation in the Mac Mail app, you’ll want to start at the primary double or triple pane primary Inbox screen as if you just opened Mail. The rest is just a matter of using the keyboard rather than the mouse, and making a new habit of that.

Basic Mac Mail App Navigation with Keyboard Shortcuts

Use the Up / Down arrows to navigate to the next or previous email message and open the selected message in the mail panel

Use the Spacebar to scroll down in the selected mail message

Use the Tab key to switch the currently active panel (Search box, Mailboxes, Inbox, Message content

That will allow you to move between the next and previous mail message using just the keyboard, but if you want to start replying to, forwarding, marking as unread, and other common mail activities, you’ll want to use some other keyboard shortcuts.

By the way, if you find the email content text to be either too small or too big, you can change the font size in Mail rather easily.

Of course, navigating between the next and previous message in your inbox is one thing, you’ll likely want to interact with those messages to, which is where the next set of keyboard shortcuts comes in for a variety of tasks in Mail app for Mac OS X.

Other Helpful Mail App Keyboard Tricks for Mac

Hit Command+R to reply to the currently selected message

Hit Command+Shift+D to send an active message, reply, or forward

Hit Command+Shift+U to mark as unread the selected message

Hit Command+N to create a new eMail message

Hit Command+Shift+F to forward the selected message

Hit the Return key to open the selected message into a new window

Use Command+W to close an open message, or the primary message window

Use Command+0 (zero) to return to the message viewing window if you accidentally close it

There are many other keyboard shortcuts for Mail in MacOS X, but these are some of the essentials that are worth remembering without being overloaded with some of the more obscure options. Exploring the Mail menu items will reveal many more, and you can always create a custom keystroke for something if you discover a menu item function that doesn’t yet have an attached keyboard shortcut.

At the moment, the Mail app in Mac OS X does not include a “Next Message” or “Previous Message” keyboard shortcut that is independent of the arrow keys for selecting messages, which can lead to some confusion for users who have turned to the Mail app in Mac OS X as their default email client, particularly if they came to Mail from another email client like MS Outlook or Thunderbird. Note that none of these keyboard shortcuts for moving around Mail are specific to any version of Mac OS X, they’ve been on the Mac for quite some time and therefore will work regardless of the computer running MacOS Mojave, High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, Mac OS X Yosemite, Mavericks, Mountain Lion, Snow Leopard, and likely just about any other version too.

Considering that iOS does include a “Next” and “Previous” message button in the Mail app on iPhone and iPad, it wouldn’t be too surprising if such a feature was added to the Mac sometime in the future. In the meantime, use the arrow keys and spacebar trick, it’s effective and makes browsing through a ton of emails quite fast.

Related

How To Setup A Web Server In Mac Os X Mountain Lion

In the recent version of Mac OS X, the web server is one of the component that is built-in by default. Prior to Mountain Lion, users can easily turn on the web server via the “Web Sharing” option in the Sharing Preference pane. That component was removed in Mountain Lion. In this tutorial, we will show you how to activate the web server in Mountain Lion, as well as setting up PHP, MySQL and PhpMyAdmin. At the end of this tutorial, you will have a MAMP (Mac, Apache, MySQL, Php) server running on your Mac.

Starting the Apache server

Apache server is pre-installed in Mac OS X, so there is no need to install it. However, to start the Apache server, we will have to use command line in the Terminal.

2. Type the following command:

To restart the Apache server, use the command:

sudo

apachectl restart

To stop the Apache server, use the command:

sudo

apachectl stop

Activating the PHP module

The Apache server is only good enough for you to run static HTML files. If you want to run a more complicated setup, like installing WordPress, you will need to activate the PHP module.

PHP is pre-installed in Mac OS X as well, but it is not included by default.

1. In the terminal, type:

2. Remove down the list until you see the line:

#

LoadModule php5_module libexec

/

apache2

/

libphp5.so

Remove the “#” in front of the line, so it becomes:

3. Save the changes (using shortcut key “Ctrl + o”) and exit (using shortcut key “Ctrl + x”). Restart Apache.

sudo

apachectl restart

The PHP module is now activated.

Configuring Sites folder

1. Open the Finder and go to your Home folder (the folder with a Home icon and your username). Create a new folder “Sites” if it is not available.

2. Back to the Terminal, type the command:

sudo

nano

/

etc

/

apache2

/

users

/

username.conf

Replace the “username” with your login username. In my case, it will be “sudo nano /etc/apache2/users/damienoh.conf“.

3. Copy and paste the following code to the conf file.

Options Indexes MultiViews AllowOverride All Order allow,deny Allow from all

4. Next, type the command:

nano

/

Users

/

username

/

Sites

/

phpinfo.php

and paste the line:

Restart Apache server

Setting up MySQL

MySQL is not included in Mountain Lion, so you will need to download and install it manually.

1. Go to MySQL Download site and download the MySQL installer for Mac. For easier installation, you might want to grab the .DMG image than the one in chúng tôi format.

2. Once the download is completed, open up the installer, you should see two .pkg files and one .prefPane file. Install all three of them.

Setting upi MySQL root password

In the Terminal, type the command:

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

/

bin

/

mysqladmin

-u

root password

'yourpasswordhere'

Replace the “yourpasswordhere” with your own password.

Note: Do not confuse this password with your Mac login account. They are not the same. This is the password for the script to access your database.

Note: Removing MySQL is not as straightforward. Run the commands, line by line, in the terminal:

sudo

rm

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

sudo

rm

-rf

/

usr

/

local

/

mysql

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

StartupItems

/

MySQLCOM

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

PreferencePanes

/

My

*

rm

-rf

~

/

Library

/

PreferencePanes

/

My

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

Receipts

/

mysql

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

Library

/

Receipts

/

MySQL

*

sudo

rm

-rf

/

private

/

var

/

db

/

receipts

/*

mysql

*

Open the file “hostconfig” with the command “sudo nano /etc/hostconfig” and remove the line MYSQLCOM=-YES-.

Installing PhpMyAdmin

PhpMyAdmin is basically a bunch of PHP files, so installing them is a breeze.

1. Download PhpMyAdmin from its website.

2. Extract the compressed file to your Sites folder and rename it as “phpmyadmin”.

3. Open the “phpmyadmin” folder and create a new folder call “config”. Change its permission with the command:

6. Go to the “Authentication” tab and enter MySQL root password in the “Password for config auth” field.

7. Lastly, enter the following commands in the terminal:

sudo

mkdir

/

var

/

mysql

Conclusion

It will probably be easier if you install a third party tool like MAMP, but that will add duplicate features to what is already available in your Mac. With a little tinkering, you can easily get your Mac to be a web server for all your web hosting needs.

Damien

Damien Oh started writing tech articles since 2007 and has over 10 years of experience in the tech industry. He is proficient in Windows, Linux, Mac, Android and iOS, and worked as a part time WordPress Developer. He is currently the owner and Editor-in-Chief of Make Tech Easier.

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How To Disable The Smart Zoom Feature In Os X Mavericks Safari

Are you enjoying OS X Mavericks’ new version of Safari, but hating the double tap to zoom feature? This feature is called “smart zoom” and it’s triggered with a simple double-tap on your mousepad. While this feature can be useful for quickly zooming in and out of websites and images, it can also be annoying since it’s so easy to trigger by accident.

If you’re wondering how to disable the smart zoom feature for Safari, it’s actually quite simple.

Wherever you find it, uncheck the box next to smart zoom to disable it. That’s it! No more accidentally zooming in on web pages when browsing in Safari.

via Guiding Tech

Image Credit: theilr

Charnita Fance

Charnita has been a Freelance Writer & Professional Blogger since 2008. As an early adopter she loves trying out new apps and services. As a Windows, Mac, Linux and iOS user, she has a great love for bleeding edge technology. You can connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn.

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Change File Permissions In Mac Os X

You can instantly change file permissions in Mac OS X without getting your hands dirty in the command line by using the Finder instead. All you need to do is access the “Get Info” panel for the file, folder, or application in question. These instructions demonstrate locating the file permissions manager, and how to adjust privileges for items found in Mac OS.

It’s worth mentioning that you can also use this trick to quickly view current file and folder permissions and ownership details in the Mac OS X Finder. To view permissions, just use the Get Info panel as described below but don’t make any modifications. Mac OS X calls permissions “Privileges”, but they mean the same thing.

How to Change File Permissions on Mac

This is the most user friendly way to view or adjust file permissions in Mac OS X, it works with anything found in the Finder file system, be it a file, binary, application, or a folder. Here’s what you’ll want to do:

Select the file or app in the Finder you want to edit permissions for

At the bottom of the Get Info window, you’ll see “Sharing & Permissions”, select the arrow to drop down the options

Adjust permissions* on a per user basis, the options being: read and write, read only, or no access

When finished, just close out of the Get Info window. The changes to permissions happen immediately as you select items from the privilege option dropdown menus.

Permission Types & Explanations of Limitations

The permissions options are fairly self-descriptive in their naming, but here’s a quick overview in case you’re new to the concepts on a file level:

Read & Write: The user can both read the file, and write to the file (make changes, modify the file, delete it, etc)

Read Only: The user can only read the file, and is therefor unable to make changes to the file

No Access: The user has no access to the file at all, meaning the user can not read the file or write to it

When you’re finished setting the desired permissions and privileges, close the Get Info window and the changes will take effect immediately.

Notice that you can’t make files executable through this the Get Info panels, you’ll still need to pull up the terminal for that.

One of our readers pointed out that you can use Get Info to adjust file permissions on remote files using the Mac OS X built-in FTP client, which is pretty convenient if you’re without a separate FTP app but you’re remotely needing to change privileges on something.

Generally speaking, if you’re not sure what to set, you shouldn’t mess around with file permissions since it can change the way a file or application responds to a given document. This is particularly true with system files and applications, as permissions can mean the difference between some apps working and some not. If you’re digging around because of frequent errors regarding access to files or ownership, try using the Recovery Mode method of repairing user permissions that works with Mac OS X 10.7, 10.8, 10.9, 10.10, macOS 10.12, 10.11, 10.13, etc, which can usually sort out those problems automatically without any manual modification of files.

You can also modify permissions from the command line using the ‘chmod’ command followed by flags or sequences and a file name, but that’s really a topic for another article.

Related

How To Get Os X Betas Legally Without A Developer Account

Casual Mac users don’t really care to join OS X’s Developer program, which can set you back $99 a year. Neither are they interested in Beta versions or have that kind of money to spend on something they know they won’t be using. However, Apple has now introduced a new OS X Beta Seed Program, in which users can download and test new beta versions of OS X, by simply signing up with an Apple ID. The best part? It’s entirely free.

This free status of that OS X Beta Seed Program will potentially mean that many developers may uptake the pre-release versions of OS X. This way, a lot of bugs and mistakes can be easily ironed out with some feedback, and in truth, this should benefit both Apple and the consumer. Apple has finally realised that charging a fee for pre-release versions of the final free GM isn’t quite right, and for us, the move to introduce the Beta Seed Program is inarguably a step in the right direction.

So, if you want to get involved, follow the simple steps below:

2. Once entered, agree to the “Terms and Conditions.”

Once you’re signed up, any pre-release beta builds or updates will be seen through the Mac App Store. Rumours are that Apple will be revamping its OS X interface this year at WWDC, and if they indeed do introduce a iOS 7-style OS X design, we think many users will enroll to try the beta version.

Shujaa Imran

Shujaa Imran is MakeTechEasier’s resident Mac tutorial writer. He’s currently training to follow his other passion become a commercial pilot. You can check his content out on Youtube

Subscribe to our newsletter!

Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

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By signing up, you agree to our Privacy Policy and European users agree to the data transfer policy. We will not share your data and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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